Pushnami uses cookies to enhance your experience. We use these for advertising and analytics purposes. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our use of cookies.

Can You Over-Automate?

Can You Over-Automate?

Automation is truly a wonderful thing, and if you don’t believe us, just sit down with a washboard and a tub of water and do some laundry the old-fashioned way. In a more modern sense, automation has freed up businesses to focus on their work, not marketing their work. But much like you shouldn’t dump the entire bottle of salt into your food, there can be too much of a good thing.

Can You Over-Automate?

Posted on Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Automation is amazing, but customers value the personal.

Automation is truly a wonderful thing, and if you don’t believe us, just sit down with a washboard and a tub of water and do some laundry the old-fashioned way. In a more modern sense, automation has freed up businesses to focus on their work, not marketing their work. But much like you shouldn’t dump the entire bottle of salt into your food, there can be too much of a good thing.

On Autopilot

Some things should be automated by browser-based push notifications just by default. When an invoice clears, when an order ships, when a subscription needs to be renewed—you can automate any situation where your customer just needs to know a little bit of data. But let’s look at an edge case here, when a customer files a ticket with your help desk.

It’s good to have a help desk, and it’s good to let customers know that you’re dealing with the situation they’ve brought to you. And to some degree, this process should be automated; at the very least, when a customer files a ticket, they should immediately get a push stating the ticket has gone through. It limits duplicate tickets. But we’ve all had that sensation of being over-informed. The help desk has accepted your ticket. The help desk has seen your ticket. The help desk has transferred your ticket. This is a relic from the days when everyone believed helplines could be automated, and we all got stranded in a maze of confused robots trying to find an operator.

The problem is that at no point, here, does your customer believe a human being is actually looking at their ticket. After all, a human being isn’t talking to them. This is an example of something being over-automated when the human touch is important. So how do you counteract this?


Should you automate it? Probably! But ensure your customers want it automated.

The Human Touch

First, think of any heavily automated push system like a sub-campaign, and lay out a proper flow chart. As we said, there are points that should be automated; when a ticket is filed and when a ticket is cleared, for example. But follow the flow of this “campaign” through, and put yourself in your customer’s shoes. It might make sense, in this scenario, to eat your own meal. Submit a ticket, get the notifications, and see how it tastes.

Sometimes this might involve more than one channel. For example, in our help desk scenario, you might set a rule where once a ticket is logged, no other notification can go out until somebody at the desk has given the customer a call or otherwise personally communicated with them. This may not be necessary for all tickets, of course; it’ll depend on your business. But set the expectation with your team.

And before you automate, ask yourself how the customer will view it. People don’t mind automation when the value is clear to them, but what may be valuable to you may not be as valued by your customer. Automation is a time-saver, but the personal touch can be a business-saver, so balance the two accordingly. To learn more about how browser-based push notifications can save you time and build customer loyalty, get a free trial of Pushnami!