Pushnami uses cookies to enhance your experience. We use these for advertising and analytics purposes. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our use of cookies.

Archive

Tag: audience

Four Effective Ways to Reach More Job Seekers Online

Job seekers are what drives growth for job sites, but the competition for them is fierce. According to the International Association of Employment Websites, there are over 60,000 employment-focused websites online, from searchable clearinghouses aimed at every possible job seeker to tightly focused niche industry sites. How can a site draw people looking for work, with so much demand for their attention?

Four Effective Ways to Reach More Job Seekers Online

Posted on Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Every job seeker is unique and finding them a job will require equally unique approaches.

Job seekers are what drives growth for job sites, but the competition for them is fierce. According to the International Association of Employment Websites, there are over 60,000 employment-focused websites online, from searchable clearinghouses aimed at every possible job seeker to tightly focused niche industry sites. How can a site draw people looking for work, with so much demand for their attention?

Email

Yes, email is still effective—when people sign up for it. But too often, sites simply put every remotely relevant posting into an email and call it a day. Instead, think of a value proposition you can meet for your email, such as a set number of postings that your staff hand-picks for certain industries. And set a pace that’s brisk, but not intrusive, such as a once a day at a set time of day. Just remember, you’ll need to do the targeting work yourself, and it may have to be a handcrafted email, so be sure you have the bandwidth for it.

Push Notifications

Browser-based push notifications are ideal for job seekers. Have them fill out a fast survey, asking questions such as salary range and preferred industries, and then push out postings that fit the bill as they arrive. Since they’re opt-in, only interested candidates will get the postings. And, with data analysis in the back end, you can begin targeting postings based on what they click and don’t click. If a person keeps opening financial industry jobs, for example, you can start offering them more. You can even send through third-party offers and use affiliate marketing.

Social Media

While the hype around social media has mostly died down, especially as our approach to it has become more nuanced, it’s still a useful tool for getting jobs out there. Social media is particularly useful for very narrow targeting and helping job seekers with niche skills. For example, if a culinary whiz is a big football fan, you can use that data to target jobs at stadiums, sports bars, and other workplaces that fit that person’s interests. That said, ensure you have a filter in place to deal with spam, trolls, and obnoxious behavior; it may make sense to block comments on certain sites.


Before you get to the interview, you need to find the candidate.

Blogs

Job postings are, thanks to legal necessity and turnaround, dry. Especially for hard to fill jobs, you should reach out to the company and have them discuss the job with you, to make a case for why someone should come work for the company. A blog post can get in-depth about the unique opportunities the role offers, what skill they most want to see in the role, and any other data that will help the job stand out. Make sure clients understand that they need to be clear and honest, however, and be ready to spend energy chasing them down in some cases.

The good news is that, boom or bust, there will always be a need for jobs and we’re always going to need help finding them. But especially in a tight market, a little technology goes a long way. To learn more about how web-based notifications can help, sign up for a live demo!

How to Use Push for Customer Re-engagement

Winning a customer is easier than keeping a customer, if you don’t regularly re-engage with them. Web-based push notifications, in particular, are a useful way to stay in touch with your most interested and engaged customers. Here’s how to keep a customer once they buy from you, no matter what kind of customer they are.

How to Use Push for Customer Re‑engagement

Posted on Monday, December 10, 2018

Re-engaging is what builds customer loyalty.

Winning a customer is easier than keeping a customer, if you don’t regularly re-engage with them. Web-based push notifications, in particular, are a useful way to stay in touch with your most interested and engaged customers. Here’s how to keep a customer once they buy from you, no matter what kind of customer they are.

What Do You Know?

Any relationship is founded on knowledge, and re-engaging with customers starts by asking what you know about them. Even a customer who’s made just one purchase can tell you quite a bit about themselves. Take what they’ve bought, for example; if you’re selling cloud services, and they buy a business subscription, you can safely assume they’re interested in business-level products. If they paid for it with a company card, it might be enterprise-level products.

Of course, you should be careful how much you infer from the information you’re given. Beyond a certain point, you’re ignoring what makes a customer unique. But a little thought goes a long way.

Why Did They Opt-In?

Browser-based notifications are particularly useful for re-engagement because they’re opt-in, and tied to the browser, not the platform. When a customer clicks “allow,” they’re informing you they want to hear from you regularly. So take a moment to consider the value proposition of opting in. Did you promise them VIP material, exclusive sales, or quick updates on new products? Why they opted in is not just a guide for what you should push out now, but a look into what they’re most interested in.


Brick and mortar or entirely online, it’s re-engagement that keeps customers coming through the doors.

What Else Might Interest Them?

Affiliate and third-party marketing is another approach to re-engagement, especially in industries where new products and services need time to be carefully designed, or where you have to be judicious in what you share with external parties. A good example is a car dealership. If a private consumer buys a car, they likely aren’t going to want to buy a new one a month later. But it’s safe to assume they have at least some interest in everything that goes with it, from insuring their car to fueling it to replacing parts to, at some point, trading it in and buying a new one. Affiliates and third parties you work with can engage with customers while offering useful services in their own right.

What Do They Click?

Another vital aspect of push notifications is that they offer a rich channel of data to analyze. What do various segments click among the notifications you push out? How long do they stay on the links you send? What do they do before and after they click on that link? Again, every customer is unique beyond a certain point, but, for example, if you push out word of a sale on aftermarket car parts, and a certain subset of your customers not only click, but also buy a specific part, you’ll need tools in place to spot this, and to drill deeper.

Push notifications offer a simple way to keep the interest of your most engaged, and most curious, customers. To learn more about the power of push, sign up for a live demo.

Where Are Millennials Getting Their News? 4 Ways to Capture Their Attention

In 2019, millennials are expected to overtake baby boomers as America’s largest generation. This is why attracting and getting the attention of this forward-thinking group has been a primary goal of many businesses. Regional and smaller trade publications, in particular, have struggled with attracting millennials because many in this age group source their news online. Publications must transition to more modern engaging marketing methods if they want to connect with this digitally-focused audience.

Where Are Millennials Getting Their News? 4 Ways to Capture Their Attention

Posted on Friday, September 28, 2018

In 2019, millennials are expected to overtake baby boomers as America’s largest generation. This is why attracting and getting the attention of this forward-thinking group has been a primary goal of many businesses.

Regional and smaller trade publications, in particular, have struggled with attracting millennials because many in this age group source their news online. Publications must transition to more modern engaging marketing methods if they want to connect with this digitally-focused audience.

How And Where Millennials Get Their News

The average millennial gets nearly three-quarters of their news from online sources, or any outlet they can access via their smartphones.

The problem isn’t a lack of interest in the news, however. Eight-five percent of millennials said they were somewhat interested in the news and 69% get news daily. But, the manner in which they retrieve the news differs from the pre-digital era.

Social media is currently the primary source of news for millennials. It represents the fastest way to get information and also allows for real-time opinions and feedback from peers. In addition to social media, 40% of millennials also get their news from a news-specific service, digital subscription or app.

So how can trade publications get millennials’ attention and keep it? One way is to focus on appealing to this generation—making your media trendy, portable, and engaging. Let’s take a look at a few ways to do this.

Live Video


A UBS Evidence Lab study found that 63% of US millennials watch live video. This generation loves the instant gratification of watching incoming news in real time.

To generate interest for your trade publication, consider going live on your social networks, whether Facebook, Instagram or YouTube.

Here are some ideas on what to shoot:

Behind the Scenes

Humanize your brand by shooting behind-the-scenes videos. Show team members working or gathering during company outings—essentially anything that will help you connect more with your audience will perform well with millennials.

Sneak Peeks

Your next issue is about to drop. Reveal a few of the highlights one week early (or even a day prior) to give your audience a taste of what is about to come and generate some excitement and anticipation right before you publish.

Get Them Involved

Millennials like to be connected to the brands they follow. Trust and authenticity are important to them. Ask your audience in a live video (and/or via email or social content) what content they would like you to publish next so they feel like they have some stake in the game. Are you looking to name a new column? Feature a new publication category? Offer a reward to the viewer whose ideas you end up using.

Here’s a helpful guide on how to create live videos on your social profiles.

Apps

Millennials have apps for just about everything, from ordering an Uber to pizza delivery to reminders to walk their dogs. Build an app that houses your publication. Include daily/weekly reminders via email that alert subscribers of new issue launches. Here’s a resource on how to create and develop an app.

Podcast Interviews


Thirty-eight percent of millennials listen to podcasts and all-time iTunes podcast downloads have reached 50 billion and counting. Podcasts are popular among millennials because they are portable and easy to listen to on-the-go, whether at the gym, walking the dog, grocery shopping, etc.

When conducting interviews for your publication, record an audio of the interview and publish this as a podcast. Each interview can be a new podcast episode. Publish the podcast episodes to:

  • Libsyn: This is where you can host and publish your podcast. Upload your mp3 file and embed the audio into a player on your website. You can find more information about how to do this here and here.
  • Social: Post your podcast website page link on your social media sites
  • Email: Blast to all of your email subscribers when a new episode drops
  • Notification: Inform the interviewees when the podcast goes live. Give them the url of your podcast page and specific sharing instructions so you can get more exposure through the interviewees’ networks.

Consider notifying your listeners via push notifications as well whenever a new podcast becomes available. With push, when a listener opens their smartphone browser, they’ll receive a timely alert that they have new content to consume.

If you want more information on starting a podcast, here’s a step-by-step guide.

Keep It Authentic

Regardless of the medium you use to attract more millennials, remember to remain authentic and allow your audience to see the real person behind the business. Millennials want to trust the brands they interact with. This is why in-your-face sales tactics don’t work with this crowd. Keep your advertising and communication connected, personalized and relevant so millennials feel like you care about their desires and needs.

One way you can connect with millennials online is via browser based push notifications. Push notifications allow you to personalize your messaging based on your user’s behavior and needs. This breeds relevant communication which is a more effective way to advertise to the millennial generation. If you want to give this strategy a try, sign up for a free 30-day trial here to see how push notifications can help you reach your audience and generate more sales.


Five Effective Marketing Tools for Increasing Viewer & Listener Interest

As options for news expand, newspapers, radio and television have to shift their strategies to capture the attention of viewers. The dynamic has shifted from viewership coming to news sources, to those sources coming to the viewership, and there’s a multitude of ways to bring your news to precisely the people who want it.

Five Effective Marketing Tools for Increasing Viewer & Listener Interest

Posted on Monday, September 10, 2018

News is becoming easier to access for everyone.

As options for news expand, newspapers, radio and television have to shift their strategies to capture the attention of viewers. The dynamic has shifted from viewership coming to news sources, to those sources coming to the viewership, and there’s a multitude of ways to bring your news to precisely the people who want it.

Social Media

While the dynamics of social media and its reach shift constantly, one thing that doesn’t change is that social media offers a real-time audience actively looking for news and commentary.

Each social network has a different approach to news: For example, LinkedIn lends itself to local business news, while Instagram lends itself more to local interest pieces, such as dramatic local sports photos or documenting a town event in real time. Even media sites like SoundCloud and YouTube have highly useful social features.

Look at the social media channels that cater most closely to your needs, and that your readers are most likely to use, and see how you can implement them to draw interest.

Local SEO And Digital Advertising

One of the biggest advantages modern local media has with Google is that it offers an intensely focused audience for local companies.

Any news outlet, regardless of format, should have a local SEO strategy that makes it easy for both members of the community and Google’s algorithms to find and rank their reporting. But this can go well beyond just good SEO techniques.

For example, a mix of local SEO and digital advertising can drive audiences to, for example, a newspaper’s profile of the local real estate market, or a radio interview with the CEO of a local business.

Push Notifications

Push notifications are a key part of any media organization’s marketing plan.

Push notifications are flexible tools that let your audience sort themselves into categories; if they most want to know about local sports, local business deals, or any other topic, they can sign up for notifications that will let them know a new story has arrived.

Browser-based notifications are particularly effective because they’re opt-in, are tied to browsers instead of specific platforms, and can be easily installed and configured on every page of your site. Your most dedicated audiences can get what they most want from your team with ease.


Your audience can know exactly where to tune in when you use the right marketing tools.

Repurposing Content

As time goes on, every media organization will be in the TV, radio, and print business.

We’re already seeing video clips and short podcasts accompany news and commentary articles, and articles are being turned into audio content for listeners on the go.

For evergreen content, such as profiles of local luminaries, commentary on local politics, and other topics that may be of broad interest, or are being looked at from multiple angles, repurposing it in various forms makes your content more accessible and more visible.

Newsletters

Finally, the daily and weekly email newsletter has a surprising degree of power, even now.

Not everyone is a news junkie, but they still want to be informed, and a newsletter offering quick summaries and links to the day’s headlines can be a powerful tool to draw interested, but busy, readers.

Need to know more about marketing your media business? Sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!


Give Your Customers Something With Push

There’s a number on our phones we always dread seeing. It might be a business acquaintance, relative, or friend, but no matter what, the conversation always comes around to how they want something from you. And, just like you let that number go to voicemail, your push notifications can feel the same way to your customers. How do you make sure they pay attention? By flipping the equation, and ensuring you give them something instead.

Give Your Customers Something With Push

Posted on Saturday, July 7, 2018

Even a small gift is appreciated.

There’s a number on our phones we always dread seeing. It might be a business acquaintance, relative, or friend, but no matter what, the conversation always comes around to how they want something from you. And, just like you let that number go to voicemail, your push notifications can feel the same way to your customers. How do you make sure they pay attention? By flipping the equation, and ensuring you give them something instead.

Giving Gifts

We use “give” in a loose sense, here. We’re not saying you should bribe people to open your push notifications. If nothing else, that’s counterintuitive. What we mean is that your customer should get something out of the message.

One of the most dangerous problems in marketing is impersonal marketing. Nobody wants to be seen as a unit to be squeezed for profit, and yet there’s always marketing does almost precisely this. At best, it means you fade into the noise that surrounds all our lives. At worst, it’s actively alienating to otherwise loyal customers. You don’t care about them, so why should they care about you?

“Giving” in this context doesn’t necessarily involve some sort of financial or monetary incentive, like a coupon, although it can. For example, if you notice customers consistently buy products in a certain category or have expressed interest in a certain aspect of your industry, you might push them a podcast, video or blog post on that topic. It raises awareness of your company, true, but from your customer’s perspective, you’ve passed on something potentially useful and it shows you’re paying attention. Even if they don’t click, they’ll notice and appreciate the effort.


Who doesn’t like a gift?

How To Give

The first, and most important, question to ask is how this push notification potentially makes your customer’s life a little easier. Does it tell them about a new feature? Does it save them money? Does it save them a little time? You don’t have to move mountains here, but remember that browser-based push notifications are for your most loyal and engaged customers. You know these people well, and while no push notification can work miracles, small actions add up to big returns.

Equally important is to ask what your customers value. They tell you this, in ways big and small, every time they interact with you, through what they buy, what they click on, what they email to you. Over time, you should segment them as much by what engages them as what they purchase or interact with. The more understanding you have of value for them, the stronger your relationship will be.

Finally, understand that you’re not going to hit the mark every single time. If marketing were that good, we’d never have to worry about conversion rates. This is a process you’ll refine over time as you gather more data on your customer and develop a better understanding of them.

When you focus on understanding your customers, good things happen for your business. To see how push can help, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Remarketing With Push Notifications

Nobody can keep in touch with everybody they interact with, and that’s as true of businesses as it is with friends from college and acquaintances you meet at your buddy’s birthday party. Customers mean to engage with you more often, but something else comes up, or it’s never the right time. Fortunately, with browser-based push, you don’t have to lose touch completely. You get a chance to make a new impression—with remarketing.

Remarketing With Push Notifications

Posted on Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Reconnecting with a customer doesn’t have to be tough.

Nobody can keep in touch with everybody they interact with, and that’s as true of businesses as it is with friends from college and acquaintances you meet at your buddy’s birthday party. Customers mean to engage with you more often, but something else comes up, or it’s never the right time. Fortunately, with browser-based push, you don’t have to lose touch completely. You get a chance to make a new impression—with remarketing.

What Is Remarketing?

Remarketing is simply reintroducing yourself to a customer after they, or you, have fallen out of contact. The term is used somewhat interchangeably with “retargeting,” but that’s a different matter, where a customer’s tastes and approach changes, and you shift to cater to that. Remarketing is more like meeting your college roommate in a Starbucks at random and discovering she happens to sell products you use at your business on a regular basis.

The most common form of remarketing you’ll come across is the abandoned shopping cart push. Any e-commerce site worth its salt will push out a notification thanking you for stopping by and casually reminding you that you didn’t finish your purchase. But there are quite a few other ways to remarket yourself, from customers who’ve stopped buying to customers who opted in but never quite followed through on a purchase. What it comes down to is a mix of the data you have on your customers, and what will be the most welcome approach you can pick up on from that data.


Patience is key in remarketing yourself.

Remarketing Best Practices

  • The first rule of remarketing is “one and done.” You contact once, put the ball in your customer’s court, and leave it at that, at least for a little while. While taking a second spin a few weeks later is fine, don’t bury customers you’re remarketing yourself to, lest you lose their attention altogether.
  • Remember, this isn’t quite a second chance to make a first impression. Your remarketing segments will be familiar with you and your brand to at least some extent. It’s better to view this as a chance to follow up on your first impression.
  • Before engaging in any remarketing campaign, take a good hard look at the data. Who are these customers you’re reintroducing yourself to? Did they browse the site and never come back? Did they buy regularly and stop? Or are they opting in for push notifications for reasons that aren’t related to being a customer?
  • From that data, you can try multiple approaches. For example, if a former regular customer has stopped buying, you can push out a quick survey thanking them for their business and offering a small incentive to let you know why they stopped buying. Customers who browsed might appreciate an update on new features and upcoming products. Don’t feel limited by abandoned cart strategies, although remember that those strategies are tried and true.

With a little patience and the right data, you can reintroduce yourself to any customer effectively and simply. To see how being “pleasantly persistent” pays off, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

What Is Customer Identity?

In the wake of Facebook data breaches and rising concern from customers across the internet about various leaks and mismanagement, the idea of customer identity access management—or “customer identity,” for most purposes—has come to the fore. “Customer identity” is a mix of different services, many of which can touch browser-based push notifications. So, where do they touch, and when should you be concerned?

What Is Customer Identity?

Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2018

If you can log into it, it touches customer identity.

In the wake of Facebook data breaches and rising concern from customers across the internet about various leaks and mismanagement, the idea of customer identity access management—or “customer identity,” for most purposes—has come to the fore. “Customer identity” is a mix of different services, many of which can touch browser-based push notifications. So, where do they touch, and when should you be concerned?

Customer Identity Explained

The best way to think of customer identity is if a customer can log into it and then configure it, then there is some aspect of customer identity to it. That includes push notification preferences for browsers. For example, if a user opts into push notifications on one browser, and signs into a browser on another device, how that browser manages customer identity may or may not carry over push preferences.

It’s also a point of concern if you offer push notification signup behind a log-in screen, such as informational push notifications for when a product ships, or push notifications about financial matters. While browser-based push notifications can be encrypted “end-to-end,” and this data is minor next to breaches like Social Security numbers and credit card data, it still may be a point of concern for your customers, and you should have an answer for how you manage it.


Need to log in?

You Can Lead A Horse To Security…

Part of the problem with customer identity is, awkwardly, the customer. We all have customers that use awful passwords, share passwords with literally everyone, enter their passwords into any dialogue box that asks nicely, and so on. And then, of course, there is the reality of systems; if it’s designed to allow people in, there is some degree of vulnerability to people breaking in.

Fortunately, push can be used to control this. For example, you can offer a “security push,” so if somebody logs into a customer account from a device you don’t recognize, you can push an alert to the browser they’re logged into to let them know that happened. When customers make changes to their account, you can push out a link to confirm they’ve made those changes. In broader terms, if there are push notifications your customer needs to log in to your site to activate, make sure that it’s equally simple to deactivate them, making the preference visible and easy to find in your back-end.

In a broader sense, it’s worth being aware of the customer identity approach of the browsers you work with. Chrome, for example, works fairly hard to ensure a seamless experience across any form of browser. Ideally, whenever you get a new device, you log into your Gmail, and everything else falls into place. But that may shift depending on how browsers are engineered, and it’s worth keeping track of how this experience works and changes over time.

Customer identity touches a huge range of topics, well beyond push notifications. But the most important aspect is customer service. If your notifications are informative, easy to configure, and easy to use, then you’ve won half the battle right there. To see push notification in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

Use Push to Get Better Reviews

We all like to think we’re unique, but stop and think about your average day, for a moment. We’ll bet there’s a lot you do almost completely on autopilot. You probably take the same mode of transit to the same places every morning and night, and you probably don’t shake things up too much. And in our daily lives, that’s fine: Why change up coffee places when you’ve got a morning to hurry through? But in your push notification campaigns, sometimes these habits are a problem.

Use Push to Get Better Reviews

Posted on Tuesday, June 19, 2018

A good review is great marketing!

If social media marketing, big data, and complicated metrics have proven anything, it’s that the old-school technique of marketing by word of mouth remains the most effective way to sell a product. All technology has really done is push word of mouth farther, with reviews. And browser-based push notifications are a superb way to get more, and better, reviews.

Why Reviews?

It seems odd that of all the research and other tools available to customers, the most effective form of marketing is a stranger who likes a business, but you need to stop and consider what reviews offer. When users trust them, user reviews allow them to find people similar to themselves, with similar needs from the product. This is especially true of a product with multiple markets, as reviews can unearth a popular use for a product even the person developing it hadn’t considered.

That said, there is a scale to user reviews. The user reviews people trust most are, for example, the ones we find on Amazon or Google, the ones where people gush about a product in person or on private social media. User reviews on third-party websites come next, and then finally reviews and testimonials on your own site. In some cases, of course, user reviews don’t make a lot of sense: If you’re running client-side cloud-distributed industrial software, CIO testimonials might make a bit more sense, as they’re your customers. But if you’re selling routers to consumers, the neighbor of a potential customer matters a lot more than even the biggest celebrity or the most intelligent, independent expert. So how can push notifications help you secure them?


Reviews make the difference.

The Nudge

Push helps by letting you gently nudge people into reviewing. The classic, and most effective, tactic is “Have a blast? Tell your friends! Have a problem? Tell us.” Remember, what’s important to customers is that they are heard, and customers most often weigh in when something has gone exceptionally right, in their view, or very wrong. The latter, you want them to reach out directly to make right. The former, you want to encourage them to spread.

One modern approach to this is an automated technique you may have run into. If you go to a site and rate something five stars, you might see a prompt asking you to tell them why on their Facebook page. Weighing in on the page helps them feel heard, although you’ll want to reply quickly to glowing reviews with a note of thanks.

Another approach, which can also be automated, is a request to share reviews on social channels after they’re written. If somebody gives a product five stars and writes a novel-length opinion about it, that’s generally something you want to encourage them to tweet and share. An alternate approach is to push a request saying “Thank you for the review! May we share this on social media?” Give them the opportunity to decline, as it’s only polite, but many customers will be flattered.

Of course, push notifications also help indirectly, by keeping your product and company in mind; so when a friend of theirs needs what you sell, yours is the name they think of first. But by encouraging customers to talk more about it, you can get that invaluable word of mouth. To see it in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

Do Trends Matter?

More and more, marketing focuses on trends. Thanks to both an abundance of data and the ability to quickly turn around everything from copy to videos, not to mention the constant demand for content from social media and blog channels, trends threaten to overwhelm everything. But there’s signal, and then there’s noise, and trends aren’t nearly as important to your customers as what they value over the long term.

Do Trends Matter?

Posted on Sunday, June 17, 2018

Can you chase fads? Sure, but it’ll only take you so far.

More and more, marketing focuses on trends. Thanks to both an abundance of data and the ability to quickly turn around everything from copy to videos, not to mention the constant demand for content from social media and blog channels, trends threaten to overwhelm everything. But there’s signal, and then there’s noise, and trends aren’t nearly as important to your customers as what they value over the long term.

Signal Against Noise

One of the big problems is that we forget that trends have been with us forever, and none of them have endured. One of the most instructive exercises somebody new to marketing can do is to look at marketing from a few decades ago and see just how hostile history has been to trends. Take the 1990s; “extreme” marketing tried to turn everything from pants to medicine into “radikool” awesome stuff with a snotty attitude. Because the kids loved Beavis and Butthead, so they must want everything from stock investing to meat snacks to be dumb and snarky, right?

If anything, trends and fads have started igniting more quickly and burning out faster. What starts as a hashtag on Twitter might extinguish in days or even hours, in part because marketing departments pull the trigger. A great example is the fad of “unofficial” holidays. Every day is now a hashtag, usually one dreamed up by a lobbying board or another body hoping to give them a little boost. Not that we’re complaining about National Doughnut Day, but do you think that’s going to become a yearly tradition, or are we all going to forget about it within a year or even less?


Fashion or not, trends are hard to track.

Trend Or Institution?

This doesn’t mean that trends aren’t completely without use. They’re worth monitoring, and they can be a jumping-off point for your push campaign, especially if it overlaps with what you were planning anyway. If you sell doughnut makers, and somebody else is pushing National Doughnut Day, there’s no reason not to have a little fun with that.

And sometimes, a trend even ties into something of deeper value to your audience. If you’ve been building your campaign for doughnut makers around independent doughnut shops and pushing out a series of profiles about their owners, and National Doughnut Day takes off, then that’s a great amount of serendipity, and even worth speeding up your campaign for. Not only does it cater to the trend, it builds on what your customers value and makes them feel appreciated.

But trends become a problem when push campaigns are built on them. Imagine for a moment back in the 1970s assembling a masterful campaign riffing on disco only to watch angry baseball fans torch piles of disco albums. To have a campaign that sticks around, it needs to be built on something more permanent than just what people love now. The love of any crowd is a fickle thing, and it’s rare for even the most skilled marketer to capture it for more than a moment. Trends can tell you what people value, and as you monitor trends, you’ll learn more about what your customers care about and what matters to them a year from now. Want to see the power of push and long-term value? Get a free trial of Pushnami!

How Well Do You Know Your Audience?

Knowing your audience is fundamental to good marketing, and browser-based push campaigns are no exception. But it can feel a bit intimidating, at first, to get a handle on just who you’re talking to. Fortunately, you can break it down, step by step, to get a good sense of your overall audience.

How Well Do You Know Your Audience?

Posted on Friday, June 15, 2018

Sometimes, the best campaign involves going back to basics.

Knowing your audience is fundamental to good marketing, and browser-based push campaigns are no exception. But it can feel a bit intimidating, at first, to get a handle on just who you’re talking to. Fortunately, you can break it down, step by step, to get a good sense of your overall audience.

Target Audience

The place to start, especially if you’re starting from scratch, is demographics. You probably have at least some sense of your target audience, and who isn’t in it. If you’re selling cloud storage on a B2B level, your target audience will be much narrower than if you have a consumer focus. That said, have an open mind, as you may find new markets as you do your research.

Competition

It also pays to take a look at your competition, on a macro level. Some industries are so big, or so niche, that you may not have a lot of challenges in your specific area, but look for those who at least touch on it to get a sense of who they cater to and why.


Begin with what you know.

Customer Data

Unless you’ve just launched your company, you probably have at least some customer data to look at: What sells quickly, who buys it, when they buy it, when your “busy season” is if you have one, and so on. There is an important component missing to this data: Why they do it. Unless you’ve got archives of customer surveys, you will have to find that out yourself. Also remember that this is a constantly growing data set, and the conclusions you formulate will need to shift over time. No customer base stays the same, and as new markets open up, you’ll need to revisit this and think about your conclusions.

Customer Comments

Another way to get to know your customers is to listen to what they’re saying. Customers tell us what they think of us in all sorts of ways. They send us emails discussing their order, they tag us on social media with praise or complaints, they write us letters, and they casually mention things speaking to the sales team. While this needs to be taken with a grain of salt, as customers are more likely to contact you when they’re very happy with you or have a problem with their order, it’s still useful to look at the “edge cases” of customer satisfaction, so to speak.

Ask

Finally, it never hurts to ask. Getting a sense of your customer base is always worth the time and effort, and it can help you spot new markets and new approaches you might not have considered. If your B2B cloud storage company finds itself with a lot of consumer customers, for example, that may be a hint to shift focus.

Ready to see what knowing your customer and engaging them with browser-based push notifications can do? Get a free trial of Pushnami!