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Tag: segments

Lead Management and Push Notifications

When a new customer appears at your door, be it real or virtual, they’re a question mark. You know they’re interested in your product, and you know some minor details about them, but that’s about it. Lead management is the art of taking that first meeting and building it into a more detailed profile that allows you to better sell to your customers. So how can push notifications help you build a better profile?

Lead Management and Push Notifications

Posted on Saturday, June 16, 2018

Finding leads is only the beginning.

When a new customer appears at your door, be it real or virtual, they’re a question mark. You know they’re interested in your product, and you know some minor details about them, but that’s about it. Lead management is the art of taking that first meeting and building it into a more detailed profile that allows you to better sell to your customers. So how can push notifications help you build a better profile?

Lead Management Made Easy

To start with, let’s consider the cycle of lead management. From the first contact, you go through customer inquiry and establishing a relationship, segmentation and filtering, and lead nurturing, where you follow up with them at their pace and learn more about their needs. In other words, it splits the difference between a purely data-driven relationship with your customer, much like Amazon runs it, and the personal approach small businesses take, building a strong relationship with a customer.

Push notifications can help every step of the way, from the moment customers opt-in for notifications, and especially with filling in data. Let’s take a look at each step, and see how push can help.

Customer Inquiry: Push out surveys to help you get to know customers better. Tie a small reward to the survey, and make it quick to fill out. This is especially useful when a customer makes their first order; ensuring they feel heard and can give you feedback is key to any customer relationship. In fact, by opting in, based on what value you offer, they’re telling you what they care about in a business.

Segmentation And Filtering: As you get to know customers, you can build a profile from them based on, among other data, how they react to the push notifications you send out. By looking at what they click, and seeing how they react to A/B testing and segmentation, you can learn more about what engages customers. As they click, or don’t, on the links you push out, they’ll fill in their values as customers.

Lead Nurturing: As you build a stronger relationship with each customer, you can personalize push messages more and more, narrowing it down to just the products and values they most care about. With enough feedback and interaction, you can push them the product they want, at the price they want, every time, and they’ll know you’ve got their needs in mind.


Lead management is a team effort.

It’s true that push isn’t the only piece of this picture. This is a process that functions across your whole company. As data comes in, and as you work with each client, you’ll learn more about them through all sorts of ways: Phone calls, emails, orders, person-to-person interactions and more will all help you with lead management. But don’t forget, push notifications are about crystalizing one clear idea and sending it out to the people who are most likely to engage with it. By testing out, constantly, what ideas click and what ideas don’t, you’ll slowly be able to fill in a sense of who each customer is over time. To see the power of push in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

Make Your Notification A Call To Action

Push notifications are about being clear and specific. You only have so many characters, and perhaps an image, to get across an idea. So you need to pick one idea and focus on it. But in many cases, the best idea is going to be a call to action, often abbreviated as a CTA. So what are CTAs, and why are they so important?

Make Your Notification A Call To Action

Posted on Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Get your point across!

Push notifications are about being clear and specific. You only have so many characters, and perhaps an image, to get across an idea. So you need to pick one idea and focus on it. But in many cases, the best idea is going to be a call to action, often abbreviated as a CTA. So what are CTAs, and why are they so important?

Do Something!

You see CTAs everywhere in marketing materials. They’re often crisp and to the point, short sentences full of short words that use clear verbs to communicate a clear action. “Buy now” is the most obvious example, but it’s worth seeing how the approach has changed from the days of TV and newspaper ads. For example, if you load the homepage of a site that offers an app or a streaming service, one of the first things you’ll see is “Get our service now.” In fact, if you pay close attention, you’ll often see some interesting psychology at work. Look at sites that offer both a paid and free version of their content or service, for example, and you’ll often see one option or the other highlighted in some way.

Also, you’ll notice that CTAs are often paired with short and punchy copy that explains just what the service does. Spotify, for example, uses “Music for everyone” and then has buttons with CTAs underneath. In other words, more often than not, you see two ideas: “This is what this product does. Buy it now!”

Notice that they don’t leave any room for negotiation. “Buy our product, if you want to” can be funny and even work as copy, depending on your brand, but it’s not exactly compelling. Ideally, a CTA is the second part of a two-step dance; the first step is explaining the benefits of your product, and then you make the pitch to buy. But any dance depends on who you’re partnered with.


If you have something to say, don’t be quiet!

CTAs And Segments

CTAs can, and should, be tuned to the segments you’re using. If you use someone else’s computer and look at the marketing copy served, you’re likely to notice the same formulas, but with very different approaches. For toiletries and personal care products, some might be encouraged to “build” a box of products, while others might be encouraged to “curate” that same box. It’ll be the same products and box, either way, but the tone is different. Some of us view ourselves as creating something, while others view our product choices as an expression of taste, and smart segments illustrate the difference.

A lot depends on your audience. How do they see themselves? Where do you fit into their lives? Take for an example two common segments: Luxury shoppers and bargain hunters. Bargain hunters will respond to a call to “Save now!” while luxury shoppers might be encouraged to “Treat yourself now.”

No matter what segment, though, CTAs work by removing doubt, both about what you’re asking and what they can do with the notification. Want to see the power of CTAs at work? Sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Using Profiles For Better Push

Segmentation is central to a great browser-based push notification strategy. But to segment, you need data, and there’s only so much data customers offer through their order history. There is a way to learn more about the people you serve, though; simply ask them to set up a profile.

Using Profiles For Better Push

Posted on Friday, April 27, 2018

Profiles tell you what customers are really thinking.

Segmentation is central to a great browser-based push notification strategy. But to segment, you need data, and there’s only so much data customers offer through their order history. There is a way to learn more about the people you serve, though; simply ask them to set up a profile.

Why Profiles?

Profiles are a simple way for customers to offer you more data about themselves or what they’re interested in. By asking a few questions, it can help you get a stronger sense of who you’re doing business with and how to better serve them.

Profiles can come in one of two forms. Private profiles are collections of data you assemble from interactions with customers. Generally, you build private profiles by doing business with customers over time; you likely have a profile of sorts in the form of pulling up a customer’s order history and notes every time they call. You can also ask customers to fill out short surveys to get to know them better and to gather valuable data.

The other type of profile is a public profile, where customers fill out a form and “log in” to a dashboard on your site. Think of this a bit more like a LinkedIn or similar. It has a friendly feel, and it might be tied to some social networking features in your dashboard, or it might simply be a service you offer for customers to have some data in one place.

Both of these can be incredibly informative and drive better decisions for your company going forward. However, you also need to gather this information clearly and ethically, or else it won’t be worth it.


What’s the value of a profile?

Profile Best Practices

  • Be clear about why you’re asking for a profile to be filled out and what exactly you’ll do with it. Especially with data security and privacy questions looming in both corporate and private spheres, transparency will be crucial.
  • Before launching a profile initiative, ask yourself what the value for your customer is. What benefit will they see from giving you this information? More relevant push notifications? Customized coupons showing up in notifications? More push about products they care about and less what they don’t?
  • Think clearly about exactly what information you need and why, and be sure to share your explanations when customers ask. It will both help you winnow down your profile design to just the data you need, and it will help with transparency and discussions of privacy.
  • Whether it’s public or private, ideally customers should be able to see the information you’ve collected. While in some cases you may want to withhold personal notes, especially if employees offer informal assessments that don’t need to be shared, your customers should be able to see shared data like order history, answers to surveys they’ve filled out, and other data.
  • Make any profile easy and simple to change. Remember that these profiles help customers too, and they want more relevant offers.

Want to see the power of accurate data and browser-based push notifications in action? Get a free trial of Pushnami!

The Best Metrics For The Short Term

Any marketing campaign, browser-based push notifications included, needs to have a long-term plan. But also, it’s worth looking at the short term to have a sense of where your campaign is heading. While you shouldn’t make big decisions based on short-term results, you should take a look at your campaign up close to see what’s happening. Start with these metrics.

The Best Metrics For The Short Term

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2018

When looking at the short-term, pick these metrics.

Any marketing campaign, browser-based push notifications included, needs to have a long-term plan. But also, it’s worth looking at the short term to have a sense of where your campaign is heading. While you shouldn’t make big decisions based on short-term results, you should take a look at your campaign up close to see what’s happening. Start with these metrics.

Opt-Ins and Opt-Outs

In particular, keep an eye out for sudden spikes in opt-ins. You’d be surprised by what can drive these; anything from a good deal on a product you sell to a blog entry that links back to your company can tell you multitudes about the direction of your campaign. Keep a sharp eye out for rises, but don’t worry as much about dips, especially if dips in your opt-ins coincide with dips in your site traffic.

Opt-outs are also worth tracking, especially if you see them spike. That means you should dig to see what, exactly, may have caused the increase in opt-outs.

Conversion Rates

Short-term or long-term, you need to keep an eye on conversion rates no matter what. Again, peaks and valleys are what you’re looking for here, especially as you get your campaign going and begin A/B testing. Often, when testing different ideas, conversion rates are your strongest hint as to what works better, and that makes monitoring them particularly valuable. What’s clicking and what isn’t can sometimes be a subtle difference, so it’s worth watching.


In a world of immediate data, what matters most?

Site Traffic

It may not be tied directly to your push notifications, but site traffic is a metric worth being aware of, because it often dictates so many other metrics with browser-based notifications. Remember, browser notifications require users to opt-in to get them, so if nobody is visiting your website, nobody has the option to sign up for your notifications in the first place. It’s also important because you should be aware of the overall rates of opt-ins for each page you offer them and compare it to your overall traffic and the general response to that page. If you’re selling a lot of products, and customers are coming back, but they’re not opting in, that’s an indication you may need to shift the value proposition of your notifications.

Frequency

While this is likely less important in the long term, especially as you stick to a specific frequency, it is worth looking at early on. If, for example, a customer who opts into notifications gets a dozen automated ones for each order they place and then opts out, that might be an indicator you’re pushing a little too hard. Conversely, if you’ve got entire segments that are going without a notification for a week, it’s time to either push something to them or focus on the other segments those customers are in. Frequency can tell you quite a bit about what your campaign is actually doing where the rubber meets the road.

It’s easy, especially in the short term, to get overwhelmed by data. So, take a moment and look closely at what data matters most to you. To get an idea of what a powerful push notification campaign can do for you, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

How To Plot Out Sub-Campaigns

With market segments and different products and services come sub-campaigns. It’s easy enough to design a small campaign promoting a product when it launches, but after launch, you need several sub-campaigns to drive different segments towards your goals. So, how should you plan out and implement sub-campaigns? Here’s one way of doing it—the flowchart method.

How To Plot Out Sub-Campaigns

Posted on Thursday, April 5, 2018

Sub-campaigns flow naturally from one subject to the next.

With market segments and different products and services come sub-campaigns. It’s easy enough to design a small campaign promoting a product when it launches, but after launch, you need several sub-campaigns to drive different segments towards your goals. So, how should you plan out and implement sub-campaigns? Here’s one way of doing it—the flowchart method.

What Are Your Segments?

It starts with segments. Let’s say you’re selling cloud storage. Segments might include small businesses, corporate clients, consumers who want to store personally important data remotely, and consumers who want to, for example, protect scans of family photos with off-site storage. You should take a little time and figure out the specific use cases for each of these segments. Look at what they’ve been telling you and how they use your service.

Where Do They Overlap?

Once you’ve got an idea of what your segments are, it’s good to take a look at where they might overlap. Consumers who just want to store a backup of their tax returns off-site probably haven’t thought that they could use the same service to store family photos, so it’s worth presenting that particular use case, for example. But perhaps some of your small businesses are photographers who can use cloud storage to keep their business documents and develop a consumer-facing tool that lets their clients access proofs and preview images? Look closely at this overlap.


It begins with one point.

What’s The Starting Point?

Every campaign usually starts with one notification or a handful of notifications. Thus, before you draft any sub-campaign, you should draft its starting points. This generally takes the form of one notification aimed at a segment or a handful of segments, so figure out what the ideal action is for your notification. Do you want to drive sign-ups for your cloud service? Raise awareness of the product?

What’s Next?

If you’ve built a flowchart, then you know what’s next. Browser-based notifications are binary in their reaction; either you get the conversion, or you don’t. This is where segment overlap comes into play. If the customer isn’t interested in one use case, it’s worth trying another one. But of course, corporate clients aren’t interested in customer-facing solutions and vice versa. So, pick a few “non-conversion” responses to link to, while remembering you only get so many bites at the apple. If a customer doesn’t react after one or two follow-ups, well-spaced apart, then it’s time to wrap it up.

What’s The Flow?

Once you’ve got the first steps in place, ask yourself where you want the customer to go next. Do you want to introduce them to add-on features? Do you want them to get a deluxe subscription? This is a good time to choose multiple actions. For example, if they’re not interested in a subscription, they might be interested in a feature. So, lay it out on the flowchart.

Once your flowchart is complete, it’s just a matter of writing the copy and automating. But remember, the value needs to be first and foremost in any campaign design. If customers don’t see the value, it doesn’t matter how well the campaign is designed. To see the power of push, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Should You Push Your Newsletter?

Years after they were written off as pointless, suddenly newsletters are one of the hottest trends in marketing. Everybody, it seems, really does like your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter. But that presents marketing teams with a new problem: How do they integrate their newsletter into their current campaigns, like browser-based push notifications?

Should You Push Your Newsletter?

Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Newsletters can be amazing marketing tools. But should you push them out?

Years after they were written off as pointless, suddenly newsletters are one of the hottest trends in marketing. Everybody, it seems, really does like your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter. But that presents marketing teams with a new problem: How do they integrate their newsletter into their current campaigns, like browser-based push notifications?

Newsletters and Push

The answer is that you need to gear your channels to their strengths. The value of newsletters is they offer multiple ideas in one place. You can combine a number of pitches and ideas and offer them up as a personalized buffet to your customers, who then scroll through and pick what they want.

Push notifications, on the other hand, are all about communicating one idea as sharply and clearly as possible. Instead of a buffet, it’s a sumptuous dish waved just under your nose with a fork on the side, waiting for you to take a bite. In fact, you might have even built your newsletter list by pushing out a notification that you were building one and were looking for subscribers. So how do you tie the two together?

The answer lies in market segments. While newsletters are overly broad, you’re still likely keying them to different segments of your audience. While constructing that week’s newsletter, you should look at each idea and consider what other segments it caters to. Let’s say you’re working for a bookseller: Your newsletter will be geared to history fans, another will be geared to fiction readers, and so on. To work your push campaign, you’d pick a specific book that appeals the sub-segments of that group, and push it out as a notification. For example, your science writing newsletter could be broken up into fans of space science, avid readers of biology books, and so on.

Consider newsletters as a starting point for your push notifications. Your newsletters are where you gather your ideas, refine them, and send them out, and then you use push notifications to specifically follow up with tighter segments of your audience.


Don’t just send a newsletter, fully integrate it.

Best Practices in Newsletters and Push Notifications

  • With any marketing strategy, remember that it’s goals first. What are you trying to achieve with this strategy, and how will what you’re doing help achieve it?
  • When drafting your newsletters, look at broader segments. Newsletters should reasonably be focused on a big group of your customers, and in some cases, they might be global. Push notifications should be used to single out the one idea you want more specific segments to take away.
  • Push notifications and newsletters can share copy to some degree, but the copy rule of never recycling between channels should be applied. Rewrite as needed.
  • Remember that it’s a two-way street. Some of the ideas and messages you’ve pushed out can also be a good fit for your newsletter.

And don’t forget; you’ve got other channels to draw from. Social media, other email marketing, video and audio marketing, and other approaches can help you come up with better ideas and help you reach your goals. Ready to see how browser-based push notifications are a key piece of that strategy? Sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Push Notification Segmentation

Segmentation is an important marketing tool across a wide range of platforms and applications. When it comes to web push notifications, the ability to deliver highly personalized instant messages makes proper push notification segmentation more critical than ever. New technologies are making it possible to carry out segmentation automatically, with a level of efficiency that only ML can achieve. Read on to find out more about the importance of segmentation and where it fits in with your push notification campaigns.

Push Notification Segmentation

Posted on Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Segmentation is an important marketing tool across a wide range of platforms and applications. When it comes to web push notifications, the ability to deliver highly personalized instant messages makes proper push notification segmentation more critical than ever. New technologies are making it possible to carry out segmentation automatically, with a level of efficiency that only ML can achieve. Read on to find out more about the importance of segmentation and where it fits in with your push notification campaigns.

The Importance of Segmenting Your Opt-In List

On the surface, a large opt-in list for your browser-based push notifications is a wonderful thing, especially when paired with low opt-out rates. It means you have a good value proposition and are holding to it over time, right? Not necessarily. Look more closely, and you might find that your conversion rates tell a different story. It doesn’t matter if you have a million customers opting in for notifications if none of them click through. This is why segmentation is so important.

All List, No Conversions

Of course, there’s something to be said for an audience. But unless you’re focused entirely on informational or other push categories in which user interaction doesn’t matter, there’s still the question of engagement. Some would argue that sheer numbers can make up for low conversion rates, but that is, at best, playing the ball game to tie.

This is where segmented push notifications come in. In fact, a modest, well-segmented list is usually worth more to a business than a giant list that’s poorly segmented. To understand why, let’s look at an example. You have a simple value proposition: Sign up for weekly push notifications to get alerts on weekly deals. And true to form, you deliver on that value proposition… with a generic “BUY!” message.

Buy what? What do your customers want to buy from you, and how do they want to buy it? Pay attention to the notifications you get from shopping, and you’ll find retailers never tell you just 20% off, but 20% off something specific, like a book you browsed on the site or an item you buy on a regular basis. This is why segments are important: They offer focus.

One Clear Idea

The fundamental value of browser-based push notifications as a marketing channel is that they communicate one clear, loud, urgent idea. They work because they’re specific: “Click this link to get this discount,” or “your product has shipped, click for the billing slip.” Notifications grab your customer’s attention and direct it to a specific channel or action.

Segmenting works here because while your customers may be united in wanting to patronize your business, they are unique individuals with differing needs. Plenty of people buy nails from hardware stores, but the mom searching for treehouse supplies for her kids is a very different customer from the professional contractor doing a last-minute supply run for her job site. These two consumers could be similar in some respects; they could both be moms, for example. But you need to understand each one’s needs — why each one is reviewing your products — and segmenting helps you do that.

Once you have those segments, they in turn give you a path to better focus your notifications. A big list gives you a lot of segments to work with, but it’s ensuring all those segments feel heard that will get the most out of that list.

Any push notification segmentation strategy is about balance. It’s not enough to just reach a wide number of people who want to hear what you have to say — you have to say something that makes them urgently want to engage with you. So build your opt-ins, but look closely at who’s coming in and search for the spark of inspiration that will make them a loyal customer.

What Are Your Segments?

When launching segmented campaigns via push notifications, it is important to know to whom you are pushing and why you are pushing this particular message to them. Too often, “global” campaigns are run with little consideration for your individual user data. That is a missed opportunity for more sales and stronger loyalty. Here is how you can drill down, find specific segments, and re-capture that opportunity.


Who Are Your Users?

Every user who comes to your site is unique, of course. However, for the most part, there are only so many reasons to come to your website in the first place. It pays to look at those reasons and build segments that correspond with each.

For example, you likely have a group of continual “subscribers.” These are loyal customers who come back to your site with regular frequency to renew a service or to refill their supply of your product. What types of push notifications would these subscribers appreciate?

Conversely, you probably also have a group of bargain hunters. You will never see this segment until you have a great sale running, and then they will be filling up their carts as fast as you can process them. So how can you turn them into subscribers?

Fuzzy Segments

You will often find that segments overlap. A subscriber can just as easily be a bargain hunter too, one who hits the clearance section on a regular basis. When you find these overlaps in your push campaign, you have to ask yourself what your goals are. On which membership do you want to focus? What makes sense for your metrics? Do they tend more toward one or the other?

Again, every user is unique, and segments should not be treated as iron-clad boundaries that neither you nor your users will ever cross. Users will often surprise you with how they act or react to the market, your site, and their own lives. By the same token, segments change over time. Users see their needs shift, their budgets increase or decrease, and a whole host of other changes.

These shifts are rarely abrupt, but they do happen, and you will need to keep an eye on them as they occur. They will often turn up in your metrics as gradual changes. Slowly a segment will shift to new products, look for different things, or stop clicking through on certain notifications. Also keep in mind that you might see entirely new segments emerge as you introduce new products and services or as users find different approaches to your product. Remember when Mentos embraced the Diet-Coke-and-Mentos fountains fad? Hey, it was a small segment, but it was still a segment!

Segments will be an ever-shifting part of your marketing strategy as it evolves, and your view of them should evolve too. By keeping track of these changes, you will be able to stay on top of your user’s changing tastes and move to match them.

With Segments, How Small Is Too Small?

Market segmentation is one of the greatest innovations in marketing. Where before you had to put out the broadest possible message and hope for the best, now you can use data to pick out the many, many groups your customers belong to, whether it’s by location, demographics, or purchases. You can slice and dice your data so many different ways and pull out the tiniest segments and craft a message just for them. But should you?

How Segmented Is Over-Segmented?

Much like the global push is a bit excessive or simplistic in the opinion of many experts, you can take it too far the other way and narrow your audience down to excessively tiny groups that won’t make much of a difference. Sure, it’s neat to be able to pull a list of all the people who opted in for push notifications, bought one specific product of yours, and live in Chicago. But do you really need that level of granularity?

When looking at segments, start with your conversion rates. It’s true that the more personal and unique a message feels, the higher the conversion rate. But if you can get the same raw numbers — or higher ones — from using a broader segment, that should influence some of your decisions. Why spend extra time for the same — or worse — results?

Similarly, it’s worth looking at the time you’re investing. Crafting a narrow message to a small group can make sense if there’s a high rate of return. If you’re writing for a small audience that you absolutely know will click on your link, buy your product, or otherwise engage with your actions, then it’s well worth every bit of effort you’re putting into it. If you’re not sure or conversion rates argue against it, then perhaps you’re better off finding a broader segment.

What’s the Value?

Let’s look at it another way: Turn the question around and ask yourself what the value is for the customers you’re contacting. Again, if this is a slam dunk for every last member of a small segment, if you’re selling a $500 product you know every single one of them will buy, then maintaining such a small segment likely worth the investment. But if they’re not going to click, then why spend the effort? If you’re not sure, ask yourself this: How likely would your target segment be to send this message to a friend?

Value is one way to avoid over-segmenting. What does that segment need, and how can you meet that need? Another approach is to ask yourself what other groups this small segment belongs to. No customer belongs to only one group, especially as you examine those smaller segments. Take our Chicago example. If you were selling winter outerwear, your whole audience in and near the Windy City would be interested in your push, so why not write it for all Chicagoans?

Segment marketing is brilliant, and even the smallest segments can help you understand your audience. If your winter wear is selling better in San Francisco than Chicago, that’s something you need to know. But segments are just a tool, and you don’t build a house with just one tool.

Should You A/B Test with Segments?

There are two things anyone working with push notifications is advised to do:

  1. A/B testing on their customers, where you change one aspect of your copy and test it on a randomly selected group.
  2. Segmenting their customers, or dividing them into groups based on various characteristics.

It’s good advice, too: Segmenting helps you better understand your customers, while A/B testing keeps copy fresh and can point you toward more effective ideas. But don’t they conflict? In truth, segmenting and A/B testing are layers, one resting on top of the other, and using both can lead you to some fascinating insights.

Segment By Segment

The top “layer” of any marketing approach needs to be segmentation. Your customers are not a monolithic block of people who engage with you for the same reasons and act the same way every time they visit your website. They are a diverse group of people from across the globe using different technologies to engage with you and doing so for wildly different motivations. Walk into your local coffee shop, and you’ll see people using it as a freelance workspace, a date spot, a space to conduct informal professional meetings, and, oh yeah, a place where you can buy a coffee. And how you use that coffee shop might change from day to day, depending on anything from your schedule to your health.

Those different uses and needs demonstrate the importance of segmentation as a way to better understand your audience. As we get more personal and develop a better understanding of our customers, they, in turn, want us to view them as more than an invoice. Customers want to feel understood and heard, and both segmentation and A/B testing are part of that.

Always Be Testing

The joke about A/B testing is that it stands for “always be testing,” and that’s true, but it’s also important to test with a specific goal in mind. You can fiddle with your copy in a dozen different ways, but A/B testing needs focus, and that’s where segments come in.

Sticking with the coffee shop example, let’s say you’re trying to sell more carafes of coffee instead of individual cups. You’d approach each segment differently, but within that segment, you can engage in A/B testing. For example, for half of your customers holding meetings, you might push out a preorder link; for the other half, push a coupon for a free carafe. Then keep an eye on preorders and how often the coupon is used, and you’ll have useful data on that particular segment.

Your approach can get much more granular than that, of course, but the goal here is to test within the segment, to better understand what appeals to them and why. A/B testing is a useful way to gather small data points on each segment as you learn what they engage with and don’t, and that knowledge ultimately makes a big difference. Think of segmentation as what you learn about a person before you arrive at a meeting and A/B testing as the small talk that fills in the rest. If you take opportunities to ask questions and listen to the answers, your customers will have plenty to tell you.

Global vs. Segmented Campaigns

The case for global push argues that “global” messaging has gotten a bad rap. Before modern data analytics and laser-focused advertising on the internet, the only way to get a message out was through big, loud messages that everybody heard. Television ads were watched by millions of Americans, print ads flooded magazines, and so on. But as anybody who’s looked at conversion rates can tell you, it wasn’t the most efficient method of reaching people.

And that remains true today. With the exception of a tiny handful of industries in which everybody wants what they’re selling, mass media advertising is inefficient. But of course, we’re talking about a list of your most motivated and engaged customers in the form of an opt-in list. They’ve self-selected themselves to receive your message. That shifts the dynamic a little bit since you’re no longer throwing an ad for tires on a billboard and hoping everybody who drives by remembers you sell them; instead, you’re engaging with people who are already interested in the tires you sell and want regular updates. So where does the global push rest in this particular scenario?

Global Push, For and Against

There are two schools of thought here, and neither is particularly wrong. The first is that users prefer messages that are tailored to their specific interests and needs. This line of thinking suggests that any message that’s not narrowly focused is a waste of time and consumer interest.

The flip side of this argument is that you’ve already attracted an audience that has self-selected themselves into your marketing message. No one forced that consumer to follow you on social media, subscribe to your email list, or opt in to your push notifications on their browser. You need to consider this self-selection when segmenting while keeping the needs of the customer in mind.

The reality of the matter lies somewhere in the middle. In some cases, your product range or customer base will be broad enough that a global push makes no particular sense. If you sell men’s and women’s shoes and only have a sale on the men’s, why push it to the women? But in some cases, your audience is united around one product category or topic, so a global push will be relevant to everyone who sees it and reduce the amount of work you’re doing to reach them.

So it really comes down to your customers. If you think every single one of your customers would be interested in your notification, it’s certainly worth a global push. But look closely at both your message and your segments before sending it.

Your Segmented Push Solution

Digital transformation is affecting the way that segmented campaigns operate within enterprise marketing efforts. ML now makes it possible for each subscriber to have a completely personalized experience, resulting in higher levels of engagement and customer satisfaction. Pushnami is your only full-stop solution to segmented push notifications, as our machine learning platform automatically learns the perfect combination of content and delivery time.

To find out the true potential of push notifications for your brand, try a demo of Pushnami today.