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Tag: site traffic

The Best Metrics For The Short Term

Any marketing campaign, browser-based push notifications included, needs to have a long-term plan. But also, it’s worth looking at the short term to have a sense of where your campaign is heading. While you shouldn’t make big decisions based on short-term results, you should take a look at your campaign up close to see what’s happening. Start with these metrics.

The Best Metrics For The Short Term

Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2018

When looking at the short-term, pick these metrics.

Any marketing campaign, browser-based push notifications included, needs to have a long-term plan. But also, it’s worth looking at the short term to have a sense of where your campaign is heading. While you shouldn’t make big decisions based on short-term results, you should take a look at your campaign up close to see what’s happening. Start with these metrics.

Opt-Ins and Opt-Outs

In particular, keep an eye out for sudden spikes in opt-ins. You’d be surprised by what can drive these; anything from a good deal on a product you sell to a blog entry that links back to your company can tell you multitudes about the direction of your campaign. Keep a sharp eye out for rises, but don’t worry as much about dips, especially if dips in your opt-ins coincide with dips in your site traffic.

Opt-outs are also worth tracking, especially if you see them spike. That means you should dig to see what, exactly, may have caused the increase in opt-outs.

Conversion Rates

Short-term or long-term, you need to keep an eye on conversion rates no matter what. Again, peaks and valleys are what you’re looking for here, especially as you get your campaign going and begin A/B testing. Often, when testing different ideas, conversion rates are your strongest hint as to what works better, and that makes monitoring them particularly valuable. What’s clicking and what isn’t can sometimes be a subtle difference, so it’s worth watching.


In a world of immediate data, what matters most?

Site Traffic

It may not be tied directly to your push notifications, but site traffic is a metric worth being aware of, because it often dictates so many other metrics with browser-based notifications. Remember, browser notifications require users to opt-in to get them, so if nobody is visiting your website, nobody has the option to sign up for your notifications in the first place. It’s also important because you should be aware of the overall rates of opt-ins for each page you offer them and compare it to your overall traffic and the general response to that page. If you’re selling a lot of products, and customers are coming back, but they’re not opting in, that’s an indication you may need to shift the value proposition of your notifications.

Frequency

While this is likely less important in the long term, especially as you stick to a specific frequency, it is worth looking at early on. If, for example, a customer who opts into notifications gets a dozen automated ones for each order they place and then opts out, that might be an indicator you’re pushing a little too hard. Conversely, if you’ve got entire segments that are going without a notification for a week, it’s time to either push something to them or focus on the other segments those customers are in. Frequency can tell you quite a bit about what your campaign is actually doing where the rubber meets the road.

It’s easy, especially in the short term, to get overwhelmed by data. So, take a moment and look closely at what data matters most to you. To get an idea of what a powerful push notification campaign can do for you, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

If A Page Lags On Opt-Ins, Can You Fix It?

Ideally, every page drives a significant number of opt-ins to your browser-based push notification campaign. But when it comes to opt-ins, not all pages are created equal. If one page, or several, on your site, are lagging behind in opt-ins, can you come from behind? Perhaps. But it might also not be necessary.

If A Page Lags On Opt-Ins, Can You Fix It?

Posted on Saturday, April 14, 2018

Are opt-ins down? Then here’s what do.

Ideally, every page drives a significant number of opt-ins to your browser-based push notification campaign. But when it comes to opt-ins, not all pages are created equal. If one page, or several, on your site, are lagging behind in opt-ins, can you come from behind? Perhaps. But it might also not be necessary.

Where’s The Page?

The first question to ask is the relative “depth” of the page on your website. Web traffic is rarely equally distributed among every page on your site, and some pages just are sleepy towns next to the vibrant metropolis of your home page, especially ones you have to click through a page or two to get to. In this scenario, it’s useful to look at percentages. If your home page and your lagging page have the same percentage of opt-ins, then it’s probably the page, not your offer.

What’s The ROI?

Another point to consider is the value of your opt-ins. If a page gets relatively low opt-in counts but pulls in high conversion rates, you’ll want to see if that approach works on other pages with higher traffic. Or perhaps this is the page your really dedicated customers go to; for instance, Facebook’s log-in page likely sees a lot of raw traffic, but you probably go straight to your profile.


Low opt-ins doesn’t mean low ROI.

What’s The Value?

Let’s say you’ve answered the first two questions and your page really is lagging. The first place to start is the value you that you’re offering. It’s not necessarily that you’re offering a bad value proposition; it’s just a question of audience. If your sales page sees a lot of traffic, and your value proposition is about the latest news in your industry, you likely will have better luck with your weekly sales campaign. Approach it from the perspective of your customers; why are they on this page, and what do they do next when they arrive there?

Sometimes this can be as simple as letting the page load. If your push request pops before anything else loads on the page, your issue might be as simple as customers assuming it’s a pop-up ad.

What’s The Copy?

Sometimes it’s also a question of the copy you’re using in your pitch. Put yourself in your audience’s shoes and consider the value that you’re pitching to them. Is it clear what they’re getting? Do you make it clear what the frequency of alerts will be? Is there a compelling reason to sign on? Take a moment to address this and see what the effect might be.

Finally, remember that in some cases, you can finely tune absolutely everything, and you likely won’t see a dramatic change right away. Sometimes this has a straightforward reason: A page is drawing your best customers, and they’ve already opted in. Or perhaps they’re on a mission; if time spent on the page before clicking away is low, then it might simply be they don’t stick around long enough to pay attention to the pitch. Remember, this is a long game, and things can shift over time. But take your time to develop the perfect pitch, and you’ll see better opt-ins soon enough. If you’d like to learn more about browser-based push notifications, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Optimizing Notifications To Site Traffic

Site traffic can tell you a lot about your customers and your potential customers. Everything from the site they visited before they came to yours, to where they go afterward, to how long they spend on your site can let you shape and define how your business runs online. And the same is true of optimizing your browser-based push notifications, from picking the right value proposition to finding the right pages to offer them the opt-in in the first place.

Optimizing Notifications To Site Traffic

Posted on Thursday, April 12, 2018

What are your users telling you?

Site traffic can tell you a lot about your customers and your potential customers. Everything from the site they visited before they came to yours, to where they go afterward, to how long they spend on your site can let you shape and define how your business runs online. And the same is true of optimizing your browser-based push notifications, from picking the right value proposition to finding the right pages to offer them the opt-in in the first place.

Where Do They Come From?

The site your customers arrive at your business from can tell you a lot about them. One of the most common ways to figure out spikes in traffic is to look at this, for example. But don’t just pay attention to spikes, but the long-term trends. If a specific web forum, a social media presence, or another type of site is driving steady traffic, it’s worth taking a look at how your business is presented there, and why this audience is interested in your business in the first place. If they’re coming to you for a specific product, or if you’re being recommended for specific services, it’s worth keying your push notification values to those.


When someone comes to your site, what does it tell you?

What Do They Do?

It’s a fairly common and logical strategy to put push notification opt-ins on your homepage, but that’s not the only place to look. For example, if people don’t stick around your home page for long, but instead click on a specific link, go to a specific how-to, or otherwise immediately follow on, think about what that’s telling you about your audience. One of the most obvious examples is if they go straight to a specific suite of products in the store—that tells you what they value most, and you can design your opt-ins accordingly.

What Do They Tell You?

Both regular customers and potential customers will weigh in via multiple channels to let you know what they think: They send you emails asking questions, they tweet at you with suggestions, and so on. You should be reading these already, but as they pile up, they can tell you a lot about your customers and people who are thinking about shopping with you. Do they want more sales? Do they want more information about upcoming products? Do they use your products in a specific way and want to know more about that?

Do They Leave?

Another question to look at is where they go from your web page. For example, if somebody comes from a competitor’s webpage, goes to your store page, spends a little time on it, and then goes to a competitor’s web page, and you see this pattern consistently from users, then you’ve got some comparison shoppers on your site. So what value can you offer to get them to drop the shopping and buy from you? A first-time discount? A price-matching guarantee?

Remember that you’ll often see multiple patterns of behavior on every page, and there’s rarely a perfect value proposition for each page. So look for the most common one that makes sense and remember to keep checking the traffic; what people want shifts over time. Want to see how push notifications can change your business? Sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!