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Tag: social media

Snapchat’s Lessons For Push

Browser-based push notifications are unlike almost every social media channel out there, except one. Snapchat and browser-based push have quite a few similarities: Their power lies in their immediacy, they’re at their best when they communicate one clear idea, and they are there and gone within minutes of acknowledgment. Granted, you probably aren’t sending unicorn selfies to your clients, unless you’ve got one killer selfie app, but that’s a cosmetic difference in more ways than one. So, with that in mind, what can Snapchat teach us about marketing?

Snapchat’s Lessons For Push

Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2018
Screen with app icons.
Snapchat isn’t just another social network.

Browser-based push notifications are unlike almost every social media channel out there, except one. Snapchat and browser-based push have quite a few similarities: Their power lies in their immediacy, they’re at their best when they communicate one clear idea, and they are there and gone within minutes of acknowledgment. Granted, you probably aren’t sending unicorn selfies to your clients, unless you’ve got one killer selfie app, but that’s a cosmetic difference in more ways than one. So, with that in mind, what can Snapchat teach us about marketing?

Authenticity Matters

Much of what makes Snapchat popular is that when its users connect, whether their friends or brands and their customers, it feels in a specific moment. The platform, when it works, makes you feel like you’re communicating with somebody as if they’re right there, not mediated between you and a phone. Then, like a wisp, the communication is gone. The other side of that is that if something feels inauthentic or insincere, it’ll be welcome when it vanishes.

This underscores how much authenticity and personality matters. It’s easy to write off branding, but really good branding is a natural fit. It’s both something that makes sense for your company and industry, and something your customers see you as. Notice that when companies that are a bit stodgy-seeming rebrand, the good ones do so with a knowing wink.

Strategy Is Key

Success on Snapchat as a marketing platform is almost universally tied to a smart, detailed strategy. Find a successful marketing campaign on Snapchat, such as GrubHub, and you will find weeks of planning, image and sound design, and research to best understand the customer. It’s a lot of work for something designed to disappear, yes, but that level of care gives it more immediacy. After all, if you spend a lot of time on something so ephemeral, it makes it that much more relevant.

Fortunately, browser-based push is slightly less elaborate than Snapchat, although the technology is moving quickly. But the lesson is sound: You should not be pushing out notifications just to push. You should have a clear plan with goals you want to reach, and know exactly why you’re pushing.

Computer keyboard and mobile phone with snapchat displayed.
What can Snapchat teach you?

Know Your Audience

The most effective Snapchat campaigns are audience-focused to an almost absurd degree. The best Snapchat marketers track the demographics of the platform and can tell you exactly what age range is using it for which reasons, and how their marketing draws from that to build up excitement.

Similarly, that range of detail can serve you incredibly well with push. One thing that will stand out about Snapchat marketing is how this level of detail is used. Almost everything in Snapchat marketing is heavily segmented for maximum appeal. Since there’s only a very short window to capture and hold attention, Snapchat marketers need to make the most of it.

In short, Snapchat and browser-based push notifications are all about striking when the iron is hot, and knowing exactly where to hit for maximum impact. Also, Snapchat has stickers, and push notifications don’t, but hey, technology is improving all the time. To see the power of push in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

Four Effective Ways to Reach More Job Seekers Online

Job seekers are what drives growth for job sites, but the competition for them is fierce. According to the International Association of Employment Websites, there are over 60,000 employment-focused websites online, from searchable clearinghouses aimed at every possible job seeker to tightly focused niche industry sites. How can a site draw people looking for work, with so much demand for their attention?

Four Effective Ways to Reach More Job Seekers Online

Posted on Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Every job seeker is unique and finding them a job will require equally unique approaches.

Job seekers are what drives growth for job sites, but the competition for them is fierce. According to the International Association of Employment Websites, there are over 60,000 employment-focused websites online, from searchable clearinghouses aimed at every possible job seeker to tightly focused niche industry sites. How can a site draw people looking for work, with so much demand for their attention?

Email

Yes, email is still effective—when people sign up for it. But too often, sites simply put every remotely relevant posting into an email and call it a day. Instead, think of a value proposition you can meet for your email, such as a set number of postings that your staff hand-picks for certain industries. And set a pace that’s brisk, but not intrusive, such as a once a day at a set time of day. Just remember, you’ll need to do the targeting work yourself, and it may have to be a handcrafted email, so be sure you have the bandwidth for it.

Push Notifications

Browser-based push notifications are ideal for job seekers. Have them fill out a fast survey, asking questions such as salary range and preferred industries, and then push out postings that fit the bill as they arrive. Since they’re opt-in, only interested candidates will get the postings. And, with data analysis in the back end, you can begin targeting postings based on what they click and don’t click. If a person keeps opening financial industry jobs, for example, you can start offering them more. You can even send through third-party offers and use affiliate marketing.

Social Media

While the hype around social media has mostly died down, especially as our approach to it has become more nuanced, it’s still a useful tool for getting jobs out there. Social media is particularly useful for very narrow targeting and helping job seekers with niche skills. For example, if a culinary whiz is a big football fan, you can use that data to target jobs at stadiums, sports bars, and other workplaces that fit that person’s interests. That said, ensure you have a filter in place to deal with spam, trolls, and obnoxious behavior; it may make sense to block comments on certain sites.


Before you get to the interview, you need to find the candidate.

Blogs

Job postings are, thanks to legal necessity and turnaround, dry. Especially for hard to fill jobs, you should reach out to the company and have them discuss the job with you, to make a case for why someone should come work for the company. A blog post can get in-depth about the unique opportunities the role offers, what skill they most want to see in the role, and any other data that will help the job stand out. Make sure clients understand that they need to be clear and honest, however, and be ready to spend energy chasing them down in some cases.

The good news is that, boom or bust, there will always be a need for jobs and we’re always going to need help finding them. But especially in a tight market, a little technology goes a long way. To learn more about how web-based notifications can help, sign up for a live demo!

Where Are Millennials Getting Their News? 4 Ways to Capture Their Attention

In 2019, millennials are expected to overtake baby boomers as America’s largest generation. This is why attracting and getting the attention of this forward-thinking group has been a primary goal of many businesses. Regional and smaller trade publications, in particular, have struggled with attracting millennials because many in this age group source their news online. Publications must transition to more modern engaging marketing methods if they want to connect with this digitally-focused audience.

Where Are Millennials Getting Their News? 4 Ways to Capture Their Attention

Posted on Friday, September 28, 2018

In 2019, millennials are expected to overtake baby boomers as America’s largest generation. This is why attracting and getting the attention of this forward-thinking group has been a primary goal of many businesses.

Regional and smaller trade publications, in particular, have struggled with attracting millennials because many in this age group source their news online. Publications must transition to more modern engaging marketing methods if they want to connect with this digitally-focused audience.

How And Where Millennials Get Their News

The average millennial gets nearly three-quarters of their news from online sources, or any outlet they can access via their smartphones.

The problem isn’t a lack of interest in the news, however. Eight-five percent of millennials said they were somewhat interested in the news and 69% get news daily. But, the manner in which they retrieve the news differs from the pre-digital era.

Social media is currently the primary source of news for millennials. It represents the fastest way to get information and also allows for real-time opinions and feedback from peers. In addition to social media, 40% of millennials also get their news from a news-specific service, digital subscription or app.

So how can trade publications get millennials’ attention and keep it? One way is to focus on appealing to this generation—making your media trendy, portable, and engaging. Let’s take a look at a few ways to do this.

Live Video


A UBS Evidence Lab study found that 63% of US millennials watch live video. This generation loves the instant gratification of watching incoming news in real time.

To generate interest for your trade publication, consider going live on your social networks, whether Facebook, Instagram or YouTube.

Here are some ideas on what to shoot:

Behind the Scenes

Humanize your brand by shooting behind-the-scenes videos. Show team members working or gathering during company outings—essentially anything that will help you connect more with your audience will perform well with millennials.

Sneak Peeks

Your next issue is about to drop. Reveal a few of the highlights one week early (or even a day prior) to give your audience a taste of what is about to come and generate some excitement and anticipation right before you publish.

Get Them Involved

Millennials like to be connected to the brands they follow. Trust and authenticity are important to them. Ask your audience in a live video (and/or via email or social content) what content they would like you to publish next so they feel like they have some stake in the game. Are you looking to name a new column? Feature a new publication category? Offer a reward to the viewer whose ideas you end up using.

Here’s a helpful guide on how to create live videos on your social profiles.

Apps

Millennials have apps for just about everything, from ordering an Uber to pizza delivery to reminders to walk their dogs. Build an app that houses your publication. Include daily/weekly reminders via email that alert subscribers of new issue launches. Here’s a resource on how to create and develop an app.

Podcast Interviews


Thirty-eight percent of millennials listen to podcasts and all-time iTunes podcast downloads have reached 50 billion and counting. Podcasts are popular among millennials because they are portable and easy to listen to on-the-go, whether at the gym, walking the dog, grocery shopping, etc.

When conducting interviews for your publication, record an audio of the interview and publish this as a podcast. Each interview can be a new podcast episode. Publish the podcast episodes to:

  • Libsyn: This is where you can host and publish your podcast. Upload your mp3 file and embed the audio into a player on your website. You can find more information about how to do this here and here.
  • Social: Post your podcast website page link on your social media sites
  • Email: Blast to all of your email subscribers when a new episode drops
  • Notification: Inform the interviewees when the podcast goes live. Give them the url of your podcast page and specific sharing instructions so you can get more exposure through the interviewees’ networks.

Consider notifying your listeners via push notifications as well whenever a new podcast becomes available. With push, when a listener opens their smartphone browser, they’ll receive a timely alert that they have new content to consume.

If you want more information on starting a podcast, here’s a step-by-step guide.

Keep It Authentic

Regardless of the medium you use to attract more millennials, remember to remain authentic and allow your audience to see the real person behind the business. Millennials want to trust the brands they interact with. This is why in-your-face sales tactics don’t work with this crowd. Keep your advertising and communication connected, personalized and relevant so millennials feel like you care about their desires and needs.

One way you can connect with millennials online is via browser based push notifications. Push notifications allow you to personalize your messaging based on your user’s behavior and needs. This breeds relevant communication which is a more effective way to advertise to the millennial generation. If you want to give this strategy a try, sign up for a free 30-day trial here to see how push notifications can help you reach your audience and generate more sales.


A Step-by-Step Guide to Push Notifications for News and Media Companies

Push notifications are powerful tools, but like any powerful tool, they need to be used properly. This step-by-step guide will lay out how any media organization can use web-based notifications with their full effectiveness.

A Step-by-Step Guide to Push Notifications for News and Media Companies

Posted on Monday, September 24, 2018

The news finds the reader with browser-based push.

Push notifications are powerful tools, but like any powerful tool, they need to be used properly. This step-by-step guide will lay out how any media organization can get the maximum impact from their web-based notifications.

Choose Key Performance Indicators

Before any push strategy can be put into place, metrics for success must be chosen. What’s the overall goal of your push campaigns? Do you want more audience members? Do you want to engage the audiences you already have more often? Is there another goal? Choose key performance indicators that will help you track this. Your push notifications platform of choice should also include several standard performance metrics, such as click-through rate, unsubscribe rate, and user platform. For news organizations in particular, knowing your user’s platform will be crucially important for push notification scheduling.

Design Audience Segments

It begins with the audience. Since they are “opt-in,” meaning your audience chooses to accept the notification, browser-based push notifications allow audiences to segment themselves for you. For example, if you cover local sports, you’d offer a general sports segment, covering national, college, and local, and break out each of the three as a separate segment on your website. This allows you to tightly focus your notifications on relevant content for each audience.

Frequency

Next, consider frequency. If you own a mobile phone, you know that the bombardment of notifications can quickly make you numb to a game or other app you’ve downloaded. The same is true of news organizations. When you ask for notification permission, you should include a promised frequency. This could be a specific number, such as twice a day, or it could be “as news breaks.” Look at your audience data and consider which value proposition makes more sense. Local TV news, for example, may want to offer specific times of day, such as morning, noon, early evening, or night to coincide with their broadcast.


Push reaches multiple audiences everywhere.

Decide Timing

The “best” time to push out a notification is constantly shifting and depends on a number of factors, including when news breaks and other notifications your audience might be receiving. A good rule of thumb is to time notifications around the times your audience is most likely to have a moment to engage with your content. Also, remember the issue of platform; if, for example, your audience is largely using their browser on a mobile device at the best time, push content optimized for those devices. Make a point of testing timing where possible, as there can be surprising moments where audiences are receptive to a news alert.

Reiterate And Test

Finally, remember that this is an ongoing process. As you gather metrics, as your audience opts to click or not on the notifications you send, as you test different times, you’ll gradually develop a more refined and accurate picture of your audiences and what engages them. A useful tool during this time will be A/B testing, where you alter one element of your notification to see if it outperforms your current usage. Constant testing will also ensure copy remains fresh and audiences don’t find your content “canned.”

This is just the beginning. Each organization’s approach will evolve over time, as every news organization serves a different audience with different needs. But with careful planning and constant testing, your organization can draw on the power of web-based push notifications. To see this power in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

Five News & Broadcast Media Stats You Need to Know in 2018

The media landscape is changing rapidly, as outlets multiply and audiences fragment. And nowhere is this clearer than in the data collected by Pew’s State Of The News Media reports, which offer a perspective on how the media is changing and where it’s heading. Here are a few key statistics from their most recent collection of data, and what they mean.

Five News & Broadcast Media Stats You Need to Know in 2018

Posted on Monday, September 17, 2018

Reporting still matters, but who’s reading?

The media landscape is changing rapidly, as outlets multiply and audiences fragment. And nowhere is this clearer than in the data collected by Pew’s State Of The News Media reports, which offer a perspective on how the media is changing and where it’s heading. Here are a few key statistics from their most recent collection of data, and what they mean.

Major Newspapers Have Seen Digital Grow By As Much As 46%

Even while physical circulation has declined, roughly 10% across weekday and Sunday editions for newspapers, digital circulation has begun to rise, substantially. The New York Times has independently reported increases in readership as high as 46% for the year ending in 2017, and 2016 saw enormous gains in readership as well. The internet is where the readers are, and newspapers need to use tools like web-based push notifications to get the attention of readers with the many online news options at their fingertips.

Local TV News Is Seeing Declines Of Up To 15%

Pew’s research has found that while the local evening news is stable, every other news slot, such as morning news and early-evening news, is beginning to see declines. Local news is still the king of televised information, in part because people care, deeply, about what’s happening in their area, but it’s clear that this advantage is beginning to erode. Local news needs to be proactive and start seeking out viewers on multiple platforms now, while they still hold a beachhead, or it may find itself in the same position as newspapers.

One of the biggest advantages modern local media has with Google is that it offers an intensely focused audience for local companies.

Any news outlet, regardless of format, should have a local SEO strategy that makes it easy for both members of the community and Google’s algorithms to find and rank their reporting. But this can go well beyond just good SEO techniques.

For example, a mix of local SEO and digital advertising can drive audiences to, for example, a newspaper’s profile of the local real estate market, or a radio interview with the CEO of a local business.

A Quarter Of Radio Listeners Also Listen To Podcasts

It should give you an idea of how powerful and ubiquitous radio is that, even now, Nielsen reports that 90% of Americans hear the radio at least once a day. Whether it’s music or news/talk is an ongoing industry dispute, and it’s also worth asking how much of that is genuinely heard, as opposed to just part of our ongoing audio world, but nonetheless, radio has a huge audience. Interestingly, though, podcasts are rapidly growing: 26% of Americans have listened to a podcast in the last month, and 17% in the last week, a figure that’s rapidly growing. In 2013, only 7% of Americans listened to a podcast in the last week. The future of radio is clearly, at least in part, in on-demand audio, and marketing channels like push notifications are often key to keeping audiences listening, both to live streams and to produced shows like podcasts.


We need reporters, but reporters need audiences.

Traditional Media Audiences Are Aging

One of the more important facts that everyone in the industry needs to be aware of is that audiences for terrestrial media are generally getting older. The median age of a cable news viewer ranges between 61 and 65. For Fox News, that number is above 65; nobody knows how far above for certain because the audience surveys generally stop at “65 or higher.” The common thread is Millennials don’t care about news, but the truth is just the opposite: The American Press Institute found 40% of Millennials pay for at least one news subscription, and that 85% find keeping up with the news is important to them. But they also don’t watch TV, sit down with a newspaper, or flip on a news/talk station. They get their news via digital channels.

Advertising Is Controlled By Tech Companies

Finally, the most important statistic, at least for ad-driven news companies, is that the digital advertising industry is dominated by tech companies like Google and Facebook. A collection of five tech companies own 65% of the digital advertising space. That means traditional media needs to be less dependent on these platforms, if they want to sell effective advertising, since they have no motivation to drive clicks or to offer a share of revenue. It’s no coincidence that public radio and television has seen increases in revenues and closed their funding gaps.

Traditional media need to build their own marketing platforms using tech companies, instead of relying on them for audience and revenue. Tools like push notifications will be the key way of building that audience, by bringing the news directly to the people who most want it. To see push notifications in action, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

The Ultimate Guide to Using Push Notifications for Your News or Broadcast Media

Both the opportunities and challenges of running a media business have never been greater. 10% of Americans still get their news from a physical newspaper, but that’s still a decline from a decade ago. Radio remains a news resource but shows a similar decline. And local TV news continues to be popular, but its audience is rapidly aging.

The Ultimate Guide to Using Push Notifications for Your News or Broadcast Media

Posted on Tuesday, September 4, 2018

People still love the local news, but they need help finding it.

Both the opportunities and challenges of running a media business have never been greater. 10% of Americans still get their news from a physical newspaper, but that’s still a decline from a decade ago. Radio remains a news resource but shows a similar decline. And local TV news continues to be popular, but its audience is rapidly aging.

All of these problems have been offset, to some degree, by the rise of digital media. Even as TV news has struggled to keep its audience, the digital platforms of local stations have seen the gap close between their TV viewership and their online viewership, especially as platforms like YouTube make it quick, cheap, and efficient to upload and archive news clips.

Online radio is seeing an explosion in listeners, although it remains an open question just how to monetize that and better understand a rapidly segmenting audience. And newspapers have found that having both digital and print versions of their stories allow them to reach much wider audiences.

There are still points of contention in the media landscape. Digital media lets you know exactly how many views an article gets and streams a news broadcast racks up, but it doesn’t tell you who’s watching or why. Just how much digital advertising should cost, and the overall financial model, is under dispute. But it’s clear the future of media in all forms is on the internet, and browser-based push notifications are ideal tools to solve many of these problems.


The newspaper is still part of many morning rituals, but it’s not the only way to get news.

Why Push Notifications?

Web-based notifications should be part of any news organization’s marketing plan for a few key reasons. The first is that a notification is urgent.

Much like a headline or a top-of-the-hour alert, notifications are designed to communicate one clear idea in a way that compels your audience to click on it. In many cases, you’re already writing strong, compelling copy for notifications simply by giving your clip or your article a compelling headline.

Secondly, when you set up notifications through your website, they’re opt-in. Media buyers and media managers know all too well the “shotgun” approach, where you send a narrowly focused message to the widest number of people in the hopes that a handful will hear it. Notifications, instead, ask people to sign on based on their specific interests.

If, for example, you set up notifications for local sports, you know that your articles will be sent to the segment of your audience most interested in what the home team’s up to. That drives the core audience, and it also makes it more likely they’ll engage with the article, commenting on it, sharing it on social media, and telling friends about it.

Third, they set the stage to better understand your audience. Push notifications, through a number of methods like A/B testing and tracking clickthrough rate, offer hard data on what your audience engages with and what it doesn’t.

Over time, and paired with other web analytics and careful sifting of the data you collect, you’ll be able to better understand what approaches most appeal to your audience, and have a better understanding of who’s clicking on what and why. Push notifications also pair well with marketing channels like social media, allowing you to put your story in front of multiple audiences in a variety of ways.


Getting on air is just the start.

For audiences, push notifications are useful tools that let them pick and choose the content they most want to engage with, and instead of logging into your site and poking around to find articles, the articles are brought to them.

When you work in the informational sphere, it’s particularly important to reduce what analysts call “friction,” the number of steps it takes to present an audience member with what they’re seeking. This helps them get the news more efficiently and, just as important, see you as a news organization that gets them the stories that most matter to them.

Web push is particularly powerful here because it’s tied to a browser, not a phone or a desktop; so as long as your audience uses the same browser, they’ll get alerts on both their phone and their computer.

Increasing Audience With Push Notifications

One important factor to remember with push notifications is that they’re extremely flexible and you can configure them any number of ways.

Let’s take, for instance, local election coverage. You can set up push notifications in five minutes on any web page and configure them to, for example, offer coverage on the local mayoral races with one click.

This serves two purposes. First, for audiences that come to your site for very specific types of news, it’s a useful convenience; with one click, they’ll get regular updates.

Second, it tells you what topics your most engaged audience members find the most compelling, and helps you direct precious coverage resources more effectively. If your analytics point towards more interest in a local race, you can give your audience what they need to better grasp it.


The news is still important, but how will it reach its audience?

And since push notifications are granular, you can use them to cater to the “long tail” of your audience and understand interests and connections that may not reveal themselves otherwise. Demographics are useful, but they only tell you so much about who’s reading, listening, and watching.

As audiences have more options to get their news and their entertainment, it’s becoming clear that you need to understand audience members as people, not numbers, and notifications will help you better understand what motivates them.

Amping Up Your Marketing with Push Notifications

Notifications can also be used, of course, to boost subscriptions. The subscription model is increasingly gaining attention not just from print media, but also from radio and television.

In many cases, it’s a “story-behind-the-story” model where longer form interviews and more in-depth pieces are put behind a paywall. There are other approaches you can take, as well, and push notifications can help promote all of them.

The most obvious method, of course, is simply to occasionally push out an alert that your “free” users can subscribe and get more out of your website. You might try copy like:

  • You’ve enjoyed 4 of 5 free articles this month. Click here to get more.
  • Subscribe now and support local news!

But there are more subtle approaches you can use as well. For example, you can put the first part of a multi-part story up for free, push it out to audiences most likely to be interested, and then have the rest available behind a paywall, or push out each part earlier for subscribers:

  • Be the first to get the full story with a subscription.
  • Read the rest of the story with a full membership.

“On air” means on the internet, social media, podcasts…

Even public media can use push notifications. For example, you can run a push “pledge drive,” where making a donation through a push notification gets the patron an exclusive item. Or you can run a pre-pledge drive push campaign where subscribers can gift subscriptions or other donations to friends and family. It can also be useful when launching a new project, like a new podcast, as you can get it out to your most interested listeners early.

Another approach is providing access to archival material. A news/talk radio station, for example, might digitize its old recordings and make them available to historically minded audiences sorted by topic and who’s involved in the debate.

Being able to track a politician’s evolving stance, the victories and defeats of a local quarterback, or how a social debate has evolved in the area over the years can be a big driver for subscriptions and engagement.

This needs to be balanced with other revenue streams, of course, and push notifications are just one part of what will be a large, ongoing marketing initiative to get subscriptions up and to draw attention. But it can be a powerful tool to remind audiences of the value of local news.


We need the news!

There’s no one solution to the challenges facing local news. The simple truth is that as audiences become more discerning, and as their needs become more complex, even the savviest media outlet is going to spend quite a bit of time playing catch-up.

Any media outlet is going to need to look closely at multi-channel marketing, offering multiple approaches to its content, and will need to dig deep both into the stories that matter most to their audiences and better understanding the many different concerns each member of their audience has.

Push notifications will be a crucial piece of this process. They help any media organization find the audience members who most want to engage with them; let that audience sort themselves into different groups to help that organization better understand their most committed viewers, listeners, and readers; and opens the door to new promotional approaches and opportunities.

The world of news and media is constantly changing, and the organizations that stand to benefit from that the most are the ones that can embrace new technology to change with it. Push notifications are on the vanguard of that, allowing you to bring the news and the content that matters directly to the audience that most cares about it, and ensuring that they spread the word. To see the power of push notifications in local news, get a free trial of Pushnami!


Use Push to Get Better Reviews

We all like to think we’re unique, but stop and think about your average day, for a moment. We’ll bet there’s a lot you do almost completely on autopilot. You probably take the same mode of transit to the same places every morning and night, and you probably don’t shake things up too much. And in our daily lives, that’s fine: Why change up coffee places when you’ve got a morning to hurry through? But in your push notification campaigns, sometimes these habits are a problem.

Use Push to Get Better Reviews

Posted on Tuesday, June 19, 2018

A good review is great marketing!

If social media marketing, big data, and complicated metrics have proven anything, it’s that the old-school technique of marketing by word of mouth remains the most effective way to sell a product. All technology has really done is push word of mouth farther, with reviews. And browser-based push notifications are a superb way to get more, and better, reviews.

Why Reviews?

It seems odd that of all the research and other tools available to customers, the most effective form of marketing is a stranger who likes a business, but you need to stop and consider what reviews offer. When users trust them, user reviews allow them to find people similar to themselves, with similar needs from the product. This is especially true of a product with multiple markets, as reviews can unearth a popular use for a product even the person developing it hadn’t considered.

That said, there is a scale to user reviews. The user reviews people trust most are, for example, the ones we find on Amazon or Google, the ones where people gush about a product in person or on private social media. User reviews on third-party websites come next, and then finally reviews and testimonials on your own site. In some cases, of course, user reviews don’t make a lot of sense: If you’re running client-side cloud-distributed industrial software, CIO testimonials might make a bit more sense, as they’re your customers. But if you’re selling routers to consumers, the neighbor of a potential customer matters a lot more than even the biggest celebrity or the most intelligent, independent expert. So how can push notifications help you secure them?


Reviews make the difference.

The Nudge

Push helps by letting you gently nudge people into reviewing. The classic, and most effective, tactic is “Have a blast? Tell your friends! Have a problem? Tell us.” Remember, what’s important to customers is that they are heard, and customers most often weigh in when something has gone exceptionally right, in their view, or very wrong. The latter, you want them to reach out directly to make right. The former, you want to encourage them to spread.

One modern approach to this is an automated technique you may have run into. If you go to a site and rate something five stars, you might see a prompt asking you to tell them why on their Facebook page. Weighing in on the page helps them feel heard, although you’ll want to reply quickly to glowing reviews with a note of thanks.

Another approach, which can also be automated, is a request to share reviews on social channels after they’re written. If somebody gives a product five stars and writes a novel-length opinion about it, that’s generally something you want to encourage them to tweet and share. An alternate approach is to push a request saying “Thank you for the review! May we share this on social media?” Give them the opportunity to decline, as it’s only polite, but many customers will be flattered.

Of course, push notifications also help indirectly, by keeping your product and company in mind; so when a friend of theirs needs what you sell, yours is the name they think of first. But by encouraging customers to talk more about it, you can get that invaluable word of mouth. To see it in action, get a free trial of Pushnami!

What Social Media Teaches Us About Push Notifications

Social media and browser-based push notifications are similar in some ways, most notably, your customers have to choose to hear from you with those channels. But they’re also very different; push notifications are urgent, immediate, and once they’re dismissed or clicked on, they’re gone—at least from the attention span of your customers. Social media is more passive and is built on an idea passed from person to person. But the two have some important lessons you can draw as you compare them.

What Social Media Teaches Us About Push Notifications

Posted on Saturday, May 19, 2018

Social media is just one marketing channel—but it’s an amazing one.

Social media and browser-based push notifications are similar in some ways, most notably, your customers have to choose to hear from you with those channels. But they’re also very different; push notifications are urgent, immediate, and once they’re dismissed or clicked on, they’re gone—at least from the attention span of your customers. Social media is more passive and is built on an idea passed from person to person. But the two have some important lessons you can draw as you compare them.

Know The Mood

Social media is all about saying the right thing at the right time, usually in the sense of a broader moment. It could be just the right joke at just the right time, or it could be a serious statement right when people most need to read it. But to do social media right, you need to “read the room,” so to speak.

The same is true of push notifications. Beyond just the data, you quickly get a sense of your customers as people and can tell when they’re most interested in your idea. Don’t just look at the data; get a sense of the mood of your customers before you push.

Make It Personal

One of the more telling aspects of social media marketing is that it has to create a sense of community. Buzzfeed is particularly instructive, here: Notice that their social content isn’t just about the topic, but about a shared emotional reaction to it. That doesn’t work for every brand, of course; plumbers don’t post to social what your choice of one-way valves says about your musical tastes. But it does underscore an important factor, that people are people and they have feelings, even about mundane things. Personalization isn’t just about looking at what your customers have bought before but trying to understand why they bought it in the first place.


You can learn a lot from what clicks on social media.

What’s The Relevance?

Finally, the difference between good social media marketing and just tweeting something out is relevance. It’s not just something for your customers to read, it’s something they’d genuinely be interested in. If you pay close attention to authors on social media, for example, you’ll notice they almost never talk about their own books. Oh, they’ll mention them, but quite a few authors will instead promote books they’re a fan of, articles they think their audience wants to read, and other tidbits along those lines.

Why? It draws more followers than just promoting their books would because there’s relevance beyond just being a fan of the author. Fans of the genre will show up and share even if they never buy the book. Push is slightly different in this regard, of course, but it’s a good question to ask as you build your strategy, especially if you’re promoting a blog, podcast, or video series: What’s the relevance to your audience, beyond the things they can buy? Does this tie into something bigger for your audience? How can you find that relevance for them?

Push notifications and social media demand different approaches, beyond a certain point. But you can learn far more about how to be meaningful to your audience by taking lessons from both. To see these lessons in action, sign up for a live demo!

What’s Social Media Telling You To Push?

Social media is a useful tool in your marketing toolbox, not least because of the sheer raw data it provides. Depending on the platform, you can see exactly how each social media post is doing, who’s sharing it, and how people are interacting with it across the platform. And that should have a degree of influence on what you push, while not being the deciding factor.

What’s Social Media Telling You To Push?

Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2018

Social media can offer fascinating data, but use it carefully.

Social media is a useful tool in your marketing toolbox, not least because of the sheer raw data it provides. Depending on the platform, you can see exactly how each social media post is doing, who’s sharing it, and how people are interacting with it across the platform. And that should have a degree of influence on what you push, while not being the deciding factor.

What’s Popular?

One of the nice factors with social media is that it can tell you what’s popular, well beyond just what’s viral. Let’s say, for a moment, that you’re the head of a local restaurant, with a fairly steady social media schedule, posting specials, food images, and other fun and useful stuff for your customers. If, whenever you discuss a certain dish, you see a rise in shares, likes, and other indicators people are talking about it, even if it’s only a modest increase, it’s worth following through and seeing what’s being said.

Following up is important here: We all know social media’s capacity for cruelty as well as kindness. But if something is popular, it’s worth taking note of that and incorporating it into your marketing across the board.

Does It Fit?

That said, you shouldn’t automatically take what’s popular on social media and plop it down into your browser-based push notifications. For example, sticking with the restaurant example, let’s say that what’s drawing likes and shares is your Instagram. But if you’re running a push notification campaign largely themed around coupons and other promotions, you do have to stop and consider how to make it fit.

For example, if you do rich notifications, it might be worth throwing in the highest-rated food photos from Instagram into your mix. Or if the dish has a distinctive name, you might consider doing a little name dropping in your text. It might even make sense to stick to trends instead of individual posts; if your restaurant’s vegetarian dishes tear up the social media charts, emphasizing your overall vegetarian options might also work better than any one dish.


Social media can be a powerful influence, but not the only influence.

Do Audiences Align?

Finally, before you push, you should take a look at the overall audience for these channels and ask yourself how much they align. It really does depend on the business and how you run both channels. Wendy’s is a superb example: In most of its marketing channels, it’s a fairly standard fast food restaurant. They talk about food; they mention the deals—it’s about what you’d expect.

On Twitter, Wendy’s is completely unhinged, in an entertaining way, picking fights with rival food chains, insulting users who trash their products, and even at one point dropping a full-on mixtape dissing McDonald’s. It’s a fascinating strategy to market itself on social media, but you’re not about to see that carry over to Wendy’s other channels. It’s a good reminder to check your audiences before assuming they’re the same.

Treat social media as what it is: A separate marketing channel with some fascinating data that’s worth considering when writing push notifications. If you’d like to see the power of browser-based push, social media influenced or not, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Push Notifications And Your Media Business

TV and radio often have to deal with the label of “legacy media.” But the reality is often more complex than just airwaves versus WiFi. When every radio station puts out Spotify playlists and every TV station is on YouTube, often broadcasters and media companies are in a unique place to use “new media” to maximum advantage. And browser-based push notifications can be core to that strategy.

Push Notifications And Your Media Business

Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2018

It’s not just the airwaves you should command.

TV and radio often have to deal with the label of “legacy media.” But the reality is often more complex than just airwaves versus WiFi. When every radio station puts out Spotify playlists and every TV station is on YouTube, often broadcasters and media companies are in a unique place to use “new media” to maximum advantage. And browser-based push notifications can be core to that strategy.

Boost Promotions

To start, push notifications can help you raise the profile of your promotions and events. Even something as simple as letting your fans sign up to get alerts for when you’re adding new songs to the rotation, or to alert them when you’re running a block of songs or changing the time slots of popular shows, can be useful. Whether you’re selling tickets to a festival, setting up a marathon of a classic TV show, or simply introducing a new on-air personality, push notifications complement your strategy.

Tie Into Social Media

Social media is a useful marketing channel for media stations, but it’s also one that can be difficult to be seen on. Even viral posts quickly get washed under by the constant churn of timelines and updates. Push notifications are useful for drawing attention to your social media posts or focusing fan attention on a particular type. For example, TV stations hoping to encourage fans to view them on a new video platform, or to come to their site directly, might push out video links to that site. Of course, it’s worth remembering social media platforms have notifications of their own, so look into methods of sorting out those getting social notifications from those who want browser-based push.


There’s more than one place to get your content out there.

Augment News Coverage

One of the more surprising ways push notifications are handy is that they allow newshounds in your area to opt-in and get news pushed straight to their browsers in one of the most direct feeds. You can even configure different options for different types of coverage. Local sports fans, local politics, and more can easily be set up to be pushed out as new clips and streams are uploaded to your social media channels or apps. It can increase viewership, of course, but it’s also handy to ensure you’re kept in mind as a news source in general. If you’re first with the news, that helps draw attention.

What Else Drives Value?

Beyond that, it’s worth asking yourself what your fans value the most from you. What’s great about browser-based push is that it offers one crisp, immediate action that your fans can engage in. So what do they most want from you? To know what the top headlines are every day? To know the setlist of each show from your station? Alerts about changes to tonight’s lineup? A heads-up that a new episode of their favorite show is arriving tonight?

Push is only limited by what your fans are interested in, and what you can most vividly communicate. So ask yourself what they’re most interested in, and you’ll find push helps you get the message out. If you’re ready to see how browser-based push notifications can turn casual viewers into loyal fans, get a free trial of Pushnami!