Pushnami uses cookies to enhance your experience. We use these for advertising and analytics purposes. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our use of cookies.

Archive

Tag: sub-campaigns

How To Plot Out Sub-Campaigns

With market segments and different products and services come sub-campaigns. It’s easy enough to design a small campaign promoting a product when it launches, but after launch, you need several sub-campaigns to drive different segments towards your goals. So, how should you plan out and implement sub-campaigns? Here’s one way of doing it—the flowchart method.

How To Plot Out Sub-Campaigns

Posted on Thursday, April 5, 2018

Sub-campaigns flow naturally from one subject to the next.

With market segments and different products and services come sub-campaigns. It’s easy enough to design a small campaign promoting a product when it launches, but after launch, you need several sub-campaigns to drive different segments towards your goals. So, how should you plan out and implement sub-campaigns? Here’s one way of doing it—the flowchart method.

What Are Your Segments?

It starts with segments. Let’s say you’re selling cloud storage. Segments might include small businesses, corporate clients, consumers who want to store personally important data remotely, and consumers who want to, for example, protect scans of family photos with off-site storage. You should take a little time and figure out the specific use cases for each of these segments. Look at what they’ve been telling you and how they use your service.

Where Do They Overlap?

Once you’ve got an idea of what your segments are, it’s good to take a look at where they might overlap. Consumers who just want to store a backup of their tax returns off-site probably haven’t thought that they could use the same service to store family photos, so it’s worth presenting that particular use case, for example. But perhaps some of your small businesses are photographers who can use cloud storage to keep their business documents and develop a consumer-facing tool that lets their clients access proofs and preview images? Look closely at this overlap.


It begins with one point.

What’s The Starting Point?

Every campaign usually starts with one notification or a handful of notifications. Thus, before you draft any sub-campaign, you should draft its starting points. This generally takes the form of one notification aimed at a segment or a handful of segments, so figure out what the ideal action is for your notification. Do you want to drive sign-ups for your cloud service? Raise awareness of the product?

What’s Next?

If you’ve built a flowchart, then you know what’s next. Browser-based notifications are binary in their reaction; either you get the conversion, or you don’t. This is where segment overlap comes into play. If the customer isn’t interested in one use case, it’s worth trying another one. But of course, corporate clients aren’t interested in customer-facing solutions and vice versa. So, pick a few “non-conversion” responses to link to, while remembering you only get so many bites at the apple. If a customer doesn’t react after one or two follow-ups, well-spaced apart, then it’s time to wrap it up.

What’s The Flow?

Once you’ve got the first steps in place, ask yourself where you want the customer to go next. Do you want to introduce them to add-on features? Do you want them to get a deluxe subscription? This is a good time to choose multiple actions. For example, if they’re not interested in a subscription, they might be interested in a feature. So, lay it out on the flowchart.

Once your flowchart is complete, it’s just a matter of writing the copy and automating. But remember, the value needs to be first and foremost in any campaign design. If customers don’t see the value, it doesn’t matter how well the campaign is designed. To see the power of push, sign up for a live demo of Pushnami!

Push Notifications Sub Campaigns, Explained

If you ask a yes/no question, or any binary question, it creates a fork in the road and that fork can take you in wildly different directions. For browser-based push notification campaigns, often that fork means sub-campaigns. So, what do sub-campaigns do, and when should you build one?

Push Notifications Sub Campaigns, Explained

Posted on Monday, January 29, 2018

Any sub-campaign starts with the question “What next?”

If you ask a yes/no question, or any binary question, it creates a fork in the road and that fork can take you in wildly different directions. For browser-based push notification campaigns, often that fork means sub-campaigns. So, what do sub-campaigns do, and when should you build one?

Yes, And…

To understand sub-campaigns, you can take a page from improv comedy. In improv comedy, you never say “no.” You say “Yes, and…” The good news is that your “yes, and…” does not have to be off the cuff. Instead, you can design campaigns around how users respond.

Here is a simple example to illustrate how. Suppose you are pushing out an offer on a monthly product, and it can take multiple forms, such as a one-month, six-month, or year-long subscription. So you have three options from which to choose and build a sub-campaign from there. For example, if somebody chooses the one-month option, you might thank them and include a clickthrough that explains what they are getting and encourages them to consider the savings of a longer subscription. You might do the same thing with a six-month, tweaking your language, and respond to a year-long subscription with a simple thank-you message, or even just a confirmation of the sale going through.

Really, anywhere you have options for your users, you can build sub-campaigns. If an abandoned shopping cart push finds customers either buying the product or closing out the basket, you can design a sub-campaign to follow up on what happened. It is really only limited by your imagination, but you should also consider best practices when deploying sub-campaigns in notification form.


Sub-campaigns can ensure your customers always feel heard.

Sub-Campaign Best Practices

  • Value should always be first. Ask yourself what value this sub-campaign offers to the user, whether it is financial, informational, or otherwise.
  • Automate. Sub-campaigns, in particular, lend themselves to automation as you only need answers to questions. Take the “If This, Then That” approach to sub-campaigns.
  • Not all roads should end in a push notification. If you ask a yes/no question and get a “no,” do not follow up unless it makes sense, such as when a client ends a subscription or an order is canceled.
  • Is this a process that is going to be repeated constantly, such as weekly or monthly? Repetition is often a concern in push notification campaigns, and your users likely should not be getting the same notifications every month. Include some form of trigger that ends the sub-campaign after a certain point, or freshen your copy on the sub-campaign every month.
  • Keep sub-campaigns consistent across brand and current messaging. When the brand or messaging changes, ensure your sub-campaign changes with it.
  • Try to limit triggers to one per page on any site, depending on the conditions of your user’s arrival. Otherwise, you may find messages piling up when you least need them to do so.
  • Finally, remember that these are your most interested and committed customers. They have opted into hearing from you via browser-based push notifications. That opt-in is valuable and should define any campaign or sub-campaign.

Ready to see how sub-campaigns can drive business and close the sale? Get a free trial of Pushnami to get started!